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Italy

TOTAL POPULATION

60.8 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

320,400 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

3,241,800 kt European Union, YEAR 2014

“A 40% reduction in GHG emissions by 2030 compared to 1990 levels.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

ITALY | ALL PROJECTS

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Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Giorgio Mussi donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Oliver Schwab donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Friederike Gnädinger donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Konstantin Krahtov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Michele Dondi donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Trayan Angelov donated € 11 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Amy McPherson donated € 20 to Giving for Mitigating Climate Change . Andreyana Andreeva-Florian donated € 40 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . joe hasell donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Milena Ivanova donated € 60 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Angel Georgiev donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Bozhana Zagorcheva donated € 5 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Leonardo Gaffuri donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Gianmarco Gallo donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . anna minerva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . marta tosi donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ildiko Milanovich donated € 50 to K'uxiub'al: Sustainable Energy for Healthy Families in San Andrés Itzapa . Ildiko Milanovich donated € 70 to Building an Efficient Technology for Women's Economic Empowerment . Ildiko Milanovich donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ildiko Milanovich donated € 50 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Robert Eckstein donated € 5 to Green Summit: Supporting Young People in Smaller Communities . Mariya Markova donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Francesca Devoto donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . john gaffey donated € 12 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Adi Lazos donated € 22 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Juliana Medaglia donated € 20 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah . FREDERIC ACHARD donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Thalita Medaglia donated € 15 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah . Katie Hereing donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Angelica Seminara donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Nevena Vlaykova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Melanie Bitto donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Cristiano Rocco Marra donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ro Leaver donated € 30 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Phili Denning donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Isabel gregory donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK .

PlanA Newsletter

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Italy has cut emissions by 23% since 1990 and has invested €4 billion to further reduce emissions between now and 2020.

Agriculture, one of the pillars of the Italian economy, as much as national identity, is already suffering clear consequences from pollution and climate change. Wine production is down by as much as 25% in the wine regions (which is much of the country). 

Venice, an ancient city sitting on a lagoon in the Adriatic sea, embodies the struggle of Italy against climate change. Each year, the city sinks into the sea, due to its old age and the rising sea level. In 2018, one of the longest-lasting floods paralysed the city for over a month until the water receded.

Waste management has become a major problem in Italy as a large portion of this task was taken over by organised crime. This has turned into a public health crisis with toxic waste littering the Campana region and improper disposal of waste leading to the contamination of soil, water and horrible effects for the people around them. 

The Italian Alps are also on the new thaw line of climate change. Since 1980, Europe has lost about 20% of its glaciers. The Calderone, Europe’s southernmost glacier in the Abbruzze, is expected to completely disappear by 2020. If nothing is done, temperatures in Italian mountains could go up by as much as 4°C and cause vast changes in the modes of life of the local population. Long-standing economic activities such as ski resorts are threatened to close in the foreseeable future.

Italy is part of the Mediterranean basin, which is going through speedy changes in its climatic fabric. This region has dried up and is expected to experience more frequent droughts and a drastic diminishing of precipitation. Italy needs help to control the adverse impacts of climate change on its livelihoods and yours. Never forget - tiramisu is best served cold. 


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DATA INSIGHTS

Italy is classified as a high-income country by the World Bank. The history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk provides useful insights into Italy's position in the fight against climate change. The following plots give an overview of Italy's historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s climate action and sustainability performance.

Italy Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Italy’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


Between 1990 and 2000, Italy’s emissions increased by 8%, which is faster than the world’s average annual emissions growth of 6%. However, from 2000 to 2009, Italy achieved emission reductions, driven by the economic recession and the growing deployment of renewable energy. Overall, Italy’s GHG emissions decreased by 5% between 1990 and 2012. 


The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (86%) of Italy’s emissions, mainly driven by the production of heat and electricity. This is primarily due to a high dependence on fossil fuel power generation (nearly 79% of total power production in 2014). Nevertheless, an energy consumption decline in the industrial sector led to an emissions reduction. To reduce its emissions further, Italy is required to step up investments in renewable energy and to phase out investments in fossil fuels. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)


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Italy Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Italy’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

graph

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


Between 1990 and 2000, Italy’s emissions increased by 8%, which is faster than the world’s average annual emissions growth of 6%. However, from 2000 to 2009, Italy achieved emission reductions, driven by the economic recession and the growing deployment of renewable energy. Overall, Italy’s GHG emissions decreased by 5% between 1990 and 2012. 


The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (86%) of Italy’s emissions, mainly driven by the production of heat and electricity. This is primarily due to a high dependence on fossil fuel power generation (nearly 79% of total power production in 2014). Nevertheless, an energy consumption decline in the industrial sector led to an emissions reduction. To reduce its emissions further, Italy is required to step up investments in renewable energy and to phase out investments in fossil fuels. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)


Italy Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

Italy's performance on sustainable development

The SDG Index describes a country’s progress towards achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGI combines indicators of climate action with other socio-economic development measures that contextualise a country’s environmental performance with the rest of its challenges in comparison to reality. 


The global SDG Index score can be interpreted as the percentage of achievement of the goals. 


Each dot in the plot represents a country and its score (y-axis). Countries at the bottom score lower on the index than the countries at the top. Sweden currently scores the highest at 85 and the Central African Republic scores lowest at 38.


Italy’s score of 74 is above the average of Southern European countries but below the majority of Northern and Western European countries. Although Italy performs well in areas such as promoting well-being and increasing the share of renewable energy, the country still falls short of addressing some aspects of sustainable development. This is mainly because Italy performs poorly on measures like reducing energy-related CO2 emissions, improving marine conservation, and changing unsustainable patterns of consumption and production. (Source: SDGI, 2018) 


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


TAKE ACTION

Italy Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

Italy's performance on sustainable development

graph

The SDG Index describes a country’s progress towards achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGI combines indicators of climate action with other socio-economic development measures that contextualise a country’s environmental performance with the rest of its challenges in comparison to reality. 


The global SDG Index score can be interpreted as the percentage of achievement of the goals. 


Each dot in the plot represents a country and its score (y-axis). Countries at the bottom score lower on the index than the countries at the top. Sweden currently scores the highest at 85 and the Central African Republic scores lowest at 38.


Italy’s score of 74 is above the average of Southern European countries but below the majority of Northern and Western European countries. Although Italy performs well in areas such as promoting well-being and increasing the share of renewable energy, the country still falls short of addressing some aspects of sustainable development. This is mainly because Italy performs poorly on measures like reducing energy-related CO2 emissions, improving marine conservation, and changing unsustainable patterns of consumption and production. (Source: SDGI, 2018) 


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


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ITALY | ALL PROJECTS

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