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Mexico

TOTAL POPULATION

124.2 million million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

480,300 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

1,912,500 kt South America, YEAR 2014

“40% reduction in GHG emissions and short-lived pollutants from a business-as-usual scenario by 2030.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

Konstantinos Dimitriadis donated € 5 to Help Build Eco-Friendly Homes for Rural Communities in India . Manon Steiner donated € 15 to Help Rwandan Cities Control Waste and Stay Clean . Bart van den Heuvel donated € 25 to Recycled Electronics for German School Children . Prateek Gogineni donated € 30 to Promote Clean Agroforestry in Rural India . Lluis Mateu donated € 50 to Bringing Back Forests In Kenya . Renato Anselmi Ricci donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,300 to E-waste Race Germany . Kiki Beck donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,500 to E-waste Race Germany . Farah Piryeva donated € 200 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ruggero Lambertini donated € 75 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Iren Dikova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Luke Farrelly donated € 120 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Andrey Bankovski donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Kalina Zhechkova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Anton Batchvarov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stivian Valchev donated € 35 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Tatyana Mitkova donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . NELIA VATEVA donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Kitov donated € 25 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Ivaylo Vasilev donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Winkler donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Valeriia Muliukova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Francesca bianchi donated € 100 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stephanie van groenendael donated € 40 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Judith de Warren donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . nat Bonnisseau donated € 1 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Luke Davis donated € 10 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stanislav Stoev donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Nathan Bonnisseau donated € 18 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Sara Riva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Luke Davis donated € 5 to E-waste Race Germany . Jürg Rohrer donated € 150 to Improved Firewood Stoves (IFS) for Indigenous Families in Guatemala . Errin Saunders donated € 10 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas .

PlanA Newsletter

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

With over 200,000 different species, Mexico is home to 10–12% of the world's biodiversity. About 2,500 species are protected by Mexican legislation. Mexico is one of 17 ecologically megadiverse countries, ranking fourth in the world for its biodiversity in terms of number of species. Thanks to this incredible life, Mexico has brought the world foods such as chocolate, jalapenos and avocados. If that wasn’t enough, Mexico is also the home of the axolotl, not only one of the funniest, cutest animals in the world but also a potential cure for cancer. 

Mexico has incredible natural assets that feed its dynamic economy and people. Mexico is also exposed to geological and climatic catastrophes. It sits on an unstable geological fault. It’s bordered by a growing desert to the North, massive volcanic mountains to the South, and two oceans that impose their systemic weather changes to the coasts.

In 2012, Mexico passed a comprehensive climate change bill, a first in the developing world, setting a goal for the country to generate 35% of its energy from clean energy sources by 2024 and cut emissions by 50% by 2050 from the year 2000 baseline. Although these targets are inconsistent with the Paris 1.5°C target, they marked a new era in Mexican politics with sustainable development at the centre of its economic and social model. Mexico has acknowledged the dangers that come with climate change and has the will to prepare for and mitigate those challenges. ¡Vamonos Chingon, Ayuda ya!

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

DATA INSIGHTS

Mexico is ranked as an upper-middle-income country by the World Bank.  To understand Mexico’s situation in the fight against climate change, it is helpful to observe its history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk. The following graphs provide an overview of Mexico’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s climate action and sustainability performance.

Mexico Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Mexico’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.

Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.

From 1990 to 2008, Mexico’s emissions increased by 30%, driven by economic and population growth. However, Mexico’s emissions slowed down in the followed years due to the global economic downturn. From 2010 to 2012, Mexico’s emissions were back on the rise, representing a 34% increase from its 1990 level. The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (65%) of Mexico’s emissions. This is primarily due to a high dependence on fossil fuel power generation (account for 90% of Mexico’s primary energy supply). 
 
In 2012, Mexico produced over 660,000 kilotonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions. This is equivalent to the annual energy use of 70 million US homes, or the amount of CO2 being absorbed annually by 3.1 million km2 of forest (nearly one-third of U.S. lands). As Mexico is among the world’s top ten GHG emitting countries, it needs to enhance emissions mitigation efforts by phasing out fossil fuel use and promoting renewable energy. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)

Mexico Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Mexico’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

Mexico Greenhouse Gas Emissions
This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.

Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.

From 1990 to 2008, Mexico’s emissions increased by 30%, driven by economic and population growth. However, Mexico’s emissions slowed down in the followed years due to the global economic downturn. From 2010 to 2012, Mexico’s emissions were back on the rise, representing a 34% increase from its 1990 level. The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (65%) of Mexico’s emissions. This is primarily due to a high dependence on fossil fuel power generation (account for 90% of Mexico’s primary energy supply). 
 
In 2012, Mexico produced over 660,000 kilotonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions. This is equivalent to the annual energy use of 70 million US homes, or the amount of CO2 being absorbed annually by 3.1 million km2 of forest (nearly one-third of U.S. lands). As Mexico is among the world’s top ten GHG emitting countries, it needs to enhance emissions mitigation efforts by phasing out fossil fuel use and promoting renewable energy. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)

Mexico Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

Mexico’s performance on sustainable development

The SDG Index describes a country’s progress towards achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGI combines indicators of climate action with other socio-economic development measures that contextualise a country’s environmental performance with the rest of its challenges and reality. 

The global SDG Index score can be interpreted as the percentage of achievement of the goals

Each dot in the plot represents a country and its score (y-axis). Countries at the bottom score lower on the index as the countries at the top. Sweden currently scores the highest at 85 and the Central African Republic scores lowest at 38.

Mexico’s score of 65 is right on the average of Central American countries, but there are still many key challenges to be addressed in Mexico; for example, reducing energy-related CO2 emissions, increasing the share of renewable energy, and safeguarding fish populations and the marine environment. (Source: SDGI, 2018) 

The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.

Mexico Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

Mexico’s performance on sustainable development

Mexico Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)
The SDG Index describes a country’s progress towards achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGI combines indicators of climate action with other socio-economic development measures that contextualise a country’s environmental performance with the rest of its challenges and reality. 

The global SDG Index score can be interpreted as the percentage of achievement of the goals

Each dot in the plot represents a country and its score (y-axis). Countries at the bottom score lower on the index as the countries at the top. Sweden currently scores the highest at 85 and the Central African Republic scores lowest at 38.

Mexico’s score of 65 is right on the average of Central American countries, but there are still many key challenges to be addressed in Mexico; for example, reducing energy-related CO2 emissions, increasing the share of renewable energy, and safeguarding fish populations and the marine environment. (Source: SDGI, 2018) 

The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.

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