THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

Madagascar

Madagascar is a natural paradise and one of the most important sites of biodiversity on the planet, with over 90%  of its flora and fauna found in no other place on Earth. Madagascar sits to the east of Africa, between the equator and the Tropic of Cancer. It’s the world’s second largest island country, and as big as Ukraine or Kenya. Unfortunately, Madagascar is also a site of hardship; the country has one of the highest poverty rates in Africa, with 81% of the population living on less than $1.25 per day.  


Madagascar’s economy has slowed down over the years, reducing its agricultural, industrial and service outputs. Despite significant advantages over other countries, like varied natural resources (gold, iron ore, fish stock, rare woods, vanilla), the population lives largely in a hand to mouth survival economy and relies greatly on the natural resources the island provides. This has detrimental effects over ecosystems and even lemurs, the country’s famous animal, are served as food or sold as pets. 


In 2009, Antananarivo mayor Andry Rajoelina led a successful coup against then-president Ravalomanana. A new constitution was promulgated and the Fourth Republic was proclaimed. Since then, a new president was elected in what was considered a free and fair election by international observers. Over recent years, the government has been investing in healthcare, schooling and business, and this has supported good economic growth. However, the benefits of this a not shared equally in the population and many Malagasy have a very low quality of life. 


The Big Island has the potential to ensure sustainable growth for its inhabitants and at the national level. The question is, can it achieve these targets in time to save its immeasurable natural treasures?

TOTAL POPULATION

23.6 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

3,100 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

822,800 kt Sub-Saharan Africa, YEAR 2014

“To reduce emissions by 14% compared to the business as usual scenario.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

MADAGASCAR | ALL PROJECTS

swipe to see more

john gaffey donated € 12 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Adi Lazos donated € 22 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Juliana Medaglia donated € 20 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. FREDERIC ACHARD donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Thalita Medaglia donated € 15 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. Katie Hereing donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Angelica Seminara donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Nevena Vlaykova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Melanie Bitto donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Cristiano Rocco Marra donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ro Leaver donated € 30 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Phili Denning donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Isabel gregory donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Akshay Pai donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Emma Burnett donated € 50 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Boyan Mihaylov donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. François Leclerc donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Clara Hermansson donated € 40 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Peter Thompson donated € 10 to Environmental Protection through Greenery and Awareness Interventions in Kabul and Wardak. Vihra Dincheva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Kris Bertens donated € 50 to Educating Montenegro's New Generation to Break Free from Litter and Plastic. Anna Lupanova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Simona Dakova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Neicho Rahnev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Pavel Boev donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Francesco Zanetto donated € 60 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Hind Alsalloom donated € 50 to Iraqi Youth Climate Change Movement. Francesca Cardani donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Michele Frison donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Fabio Sai donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Paola Tresca donated € 27 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Andrea Mongiello donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Matteo Masi donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Massimo Sacco donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ananda Nidhi donated € 20 to Toranam: Strengthening Agroforestry in Andhra Pradesh. andrea borsetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. ALESSIO GIANNONI donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Laura Zorzetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Rossana Mattachini donated € 20 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Elsa De Grandi donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Agro Eco Village Project in Ri-Bhoi District. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Building an Efficient Technology for Women's Economic Empowerment. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Strengthening Malian Forest Management to Protect Biodiversity and Alleviate Poverty. Noah Silver donated € 30 to Toxic Chemicals and Waste Sensitization for Vulnerable Communities. Stefania Butera donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

PlanA Newsletter

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Despite its reliance on its natural environment for its livelihoods, Madagascar has not yet taken the necessary steps to protect it enough from overuse and illicit exploitation. On the contrary, it has been forced to sell vast stretches of land to foreign powers such as China to pay off its debt and finance its development.  

Only 10% of the primary rainforest remains. The rest has been burned, cut or used. Of the 13,000 species known in Madagascar, 90% exist only on the Island. This includes all lemurs, half of all chameleon species, dozens of birds and a rich flora that have untapped medicinal potential. 

This puts a lot of pressure on Madagascar not to lose its ecological treasures. In the meantime, deforestation, poaching and fishing have accelerated, further depleting the Red Island’s ecosystems.

This has very real consequences for the lives of Malagasies all over the island. Soil erosion turns the rivers a mud red colour during rain, biodiversity has declined sharply and available resources for subsistence living are dwindling. 

Madagascar only contributes 0.06% of global GHG emissions. In the past 20 years, it has been hit by 35 cyclones, 8 floods and 5 periods of severe droughts, a three-fold increase over the previous 20 years. The state doesn’t guarantee much of a protection against such events. This pushes local communities to advance their own solutions, developed with the help of NGOs and other contributors.

Saving the Malagasy nature would come at a very little cost, compared to what the world would lose should it let this biodiversity hotspot die. From valuable medical progress to new ways of feeding the world, without even taking into account the cultural heritage that these forms of life represent, Madagascar and its people need support to help planet Earth remain the home of lemurs.

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

DATA INSIGHTS

Madagascar is a low-income country, according to the World Bank classification. To understand Madagascar’s position in the fight against climate change, it is useful to observe its history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk. The following plots provide an overview of Madagascar’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change.


Madagascar Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Madagascar’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the dotted line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the full line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990-2009, Madagascar’s emissions increased by 144%, driven by slash-and-burn cultivation and deforestation. After rapid emissions growth, Madagascar’s emissions stayed relatively stable between 2009 and 2012, representing a 144% increase from its 1990 level. The land-use change and forestry (LUCF) sector are responsible for the largest share (57%) of Madagascar’s emissions, followed by the agriculture sector (41%). LUCF emissions are mainly driven by changes in forest land due to logging and the expansion of agricultural activities. Within the agriculture sector, the majority of emissions come from methane produced by livestock digestion and manure.  


To reduce LUCF sector emissions, Madagascar still requires further efforts such as regulating unsustainable land use and deforestation. Moreover, as the majority of the country still relies on firewood and charcoal for cooking, introducing more efficient cooking stoves and alternative fuels will also help reduce Madagascar’s emissions. (Source: WRI, 2018; World bank, 2018)


TAKE ACTION

Madagascar Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Madagascar’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

graph

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the dotted line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the full line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990-2009, Madagascar’s emissions increased by 144%, driven by slash-and-burn cultivation and deforestation. After rapid emissions growth, Madagascar’s emissions stayed relatively stable between 2009 and 2012, representing a 144% increase from its 1990 level. The land-use change and forestry (LUCF) sector are responsible for the largest share (57%) of Madagascar’s emissions, followed by the agriculture sector (41%). LUCF emissions are mainly driven by changes in forest land due to logging and the expansion of agricultural activities. Within the agriculture sector, the majority of emissions come from methane produced by livestock digestion and manure.  


To reduce LUCF sector emissions, Madagascar still requires further efforts such as regulating unsustainable land use and deforestation. Moreover, as the majority of the country still relies on firewood and charcoal for cooking, introducing more efficient cooking stoves and alternative fuels will also help reduce Madagascar’s emissions. (Source: WRI, 2018; World bank, 2018)


Madagascar Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Madagascar’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


Madagascar is categorised as a country with high vulnerability to climate change and a low level of adaptation. Cereal yields such as rice, wheat and maize are forecasted to decline significantly; water resources like groundwater levels are under threat, leading to longer drought periods - potentially paralysing the agriculture capacity and food security of the country. This island nation is also threatened by sea-level rise due to reduced natural defences being damaged by deforestation and coral bleaching. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


TAKE ACTION

Madagascar Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Madagascar’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

graph

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


Madagascar is categorised as a country with high vulnerability to climate change and a low level of adaptation. Cereal yields such as rice, wheat and maize are forecasted to decline significantly; water resources like groundwater levels are under threat, leading to longer drought periods - potentially paralysing the agriculture capacity and food security of the country. This island nation is also threatened by sea-level rise due to reduced natural defences being damaged by deforestation and coral bleaching. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


Share this page

BE ONE OF THE GOOD GUYS...

MADAGASCAR | ALL PROJECTS

swipe to see more

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET