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Malawi

TOTAL POPULATION

17 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

1,300 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

822,800 kt Sub-Saharan Afric, YEAR 2014

"A reduction of CO2 emissions of 47% by 2030, compared to the business-as-usual scenario."

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

MALAWI | ALL PROJECTS

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Konstantinos Dimitriadis donated € 5 to Help Build Eco-Friendly Homes for Rural Communities in India . Manon Steiner donated € 15 to Help Rwandan Cities Control Waste and Stay Clean . Bart van den Heuvel donated € 25 to Recycled Electronics for German School Children . Prateek Gogineni donated € 30 to Promote Clean Agroforestry in Rural India . Lluis Mateu donated € 50 to Bringing Back Forests In Kenya . Renato Anselmi Ricci donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,300 to E-waste Race Germany . Kiki Beck donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,500 to E-waste Race Germany . Farah Piryeva donated € 200 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ruggero Lambertini donated € 75 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Iren Dikova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Luke Farrelly donated € 120 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Andrey Bankovski donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Kalina Zhechkova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Anton Batchvarov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stivian Valchev donated € 35 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Tatyana Mitkova donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . NELIA VATEVA donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Kitov donated € 25 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Ivaylo Vasilev donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Winkler donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Valeriia Muliukova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Francesca bianchi donated € 100 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stephanie van groenendael donated € 40 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Judith de Warren donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . nat Bonnisseau donated € 1 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Luke Davis donated € 10 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stanislav Stoev donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Nathan Bonnisseau donated € 18 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Sara Riva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Luke Davis donated € 5 to E-waste Race Germany . Jürg Rohrer donated € 150 to Improved Firewood Stoves (IFS) for Indigenous Families in Guatemala . Errin Saunders donated € 10 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas .

PlanA Newsletter

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Malawi has a tropical to sub-tropical climate, with variation due to its mountainous topography and wide range of altitude. It has two distinct seasons: hot and wet from November to April, and (relatively) cool and dry from May to August. The southern end of the country tends to be hotter and more humid due to its lower altitude and flatter geography. 

As is the case with many poorer countries, climate change poses a great risk to Malawi’s environment and people. The major problem is that the country is highly dependent on local agriculture, typically on a subsistence basis. This means that farmers and their families will be hit very hard when the impacts of climate change and morphing weather patterns take hold. The problem is compounded by a rapidly growing population, which places increasing demand on already dwindling resources and land. Sustaining population growth and food security is a huge challenge without a changing climate, and so Malawi must take serious steps with international support to develop adaptation measures to these issues. 

Of course, these problems are not just the concern of Malawi’s human population. The country’s biodiversity also suffers. Key issues are deforestation and subsequent soil erosion, dwindling water resources, crippled soil health and endangered fish stocks. Delicate ecosystems are hit by rising temperatures and increasingly erratic and extreme weather events (as well as this being a real problem for farmers and economy). 

To address these problems, Malawi must focus on developing its management of natural resources and finding new approaches to meeting the demands of its growing population. International support is important here. For example, USAID is working closely with the Government of Malawi to develop more resilient agricultural practices with increased yields and nutritional value. The governance of fish stocks is also being addressed, in order to maintain this precious food resource and also protect Malawi’s biodiversity from extinction.  

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DATA INSIGHTS

The World Bank classifies Malawi as a low-income country. Malawi’s position in the fight against climate change is better understood by observing its historical of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk. The following plots provide an overview of Malawi’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change.


Malawi Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Malawi’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2008, Malawi saw its emissions explode, increasing by 108% driven by the expansion of agriculture and livestock population growth. These emissions went back down following the global economic crisis of 2008. Overall, Malawi’s GHG emissions increased by 153% between 1990 and 2012. 


Land-use change and forestry (LUCF) sector are responsible for the largest share (56%), followed by the agriculture sector (40%). LUCF emissions are mainly due to the transformation of forest lands into logging grounds and the expansion of agricultural activities. Within the agriculture sector, the majority of emissions come from livestock digestion and manure left on pasture. 


In 2012, Malawi made only a small contribution to GHG emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, there is still room for improvement. Changes in farming practices such as improving manure management and developing sustainable agriculture systems still present a challenge in the future but will reduce the country’s emissions. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)


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Malawi Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Malawi’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

Malawi Greenhouse Gas Emissions

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2008, Malawi saw its emissions explode, increasing by 108% driven by the expansion of agriculture and livestock population growth. These emissions went back down following the global economic crisis of 2008. Overall, Malawi’s GHG emissions increased by 153% between 1990 and 2012. 


Land-use change and forestry (LUCF) sector are responsible for the largest share (56%), followed by the agriculture sector (40%). LUCF emissions are mainly due to the transformation of forest lands into logging grounds and the expansion of agricultural activities. Within the agriculture sector, the majority of emissions come from livestock digestion and manure left on pasture. 


In 2012, Malawi made only a small contribution to GHG emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. However, there is still room for improvement. Changes in farming practices such as improving manure management and developing sustainable agriculture systems still present a challenge in the future but will reduce the country’s emissions. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)


Malawi Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Malawi’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right. 


Malawi falls under the high vulnerability to climate change low level of adaptation capacity category. Under projected changes in rainfall and temperature, crop yields are expected to decrease significantly, which will result in severe food crisis, famine and malnutrition. As Malawi’s economy is dominated by the agriculture sector, the competition for land and water is likely to increase in the face of climate change. In order to respond to natural disasters, enhancing the resilience and adaptive capacity of response systems is also crucial. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


TAKE ACTION

Malawi Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Malawi’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

Malawi Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right. 


Malawi falls under the high vulnerability to climate change low level of adaptation capacity category. Under projected changes in rainfall and temperature, crop yields are expected to decrease significantly, which will result in severe food crisis, famine and malnutrition. As Malawi’s economy is dominated by the agriculture sector, the competition for land and water is likely to increase in the face of climate change. In order to respond to natural disasters, enhancing the resilience and adaptive capacity of response systems is also crucial. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


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MALAWI | ALL PROJECTS

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