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Malaysia

TOTAL POPULATION

30.2 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

240,800 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

14,272,100 kt East Asia and Pacific, YEAR 2014

"Reduce greenhouse gas emissions intensity of GDP by 45% by 2030, relative to 2005."

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

Konstantinos Dimitriadis donated € 5 to Help Build Eco-Friendly Homes for Rural Communities in India . Manon Steiner donated € 15 to Help Rwandan Cities Control Waste and Stay Clean . Bart van den Heuvel donated € 25 to Recycled Electronics for German School Children . Prateek Gogineni donated € 30 to Promote Clean Agroforestry in Rural India . Lluis Mateu donated € 50 to Bringing Back Forests In Kenya . Renato Anselmi Ricci donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,300 to E-waste Race Germany . Kiki Beck donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,500 to E-waste Race Germany . Farah Piryeva donated € 200 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ruggero Lambertini donated € 75 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Iren Dikova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Luke Farrelly donated € 120 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Andrey Bankovski donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Kalina Zhechkova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Anton Batchvarov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stivian Valchev donated € 35 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Tatyana Mitkova donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . NELIA VATEVA donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Kitov donated € 25 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Ivaylo Vasilev donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Winkler donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Valeriia Muliukova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Francesca bianchi donated € 100 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stephanie van groenendael donated € 40 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Judith de Warren donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . nat Bonnisseau donated € 1 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Luke Davis donated € 10 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stanislav Stoev donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Nathan Bonnisseau donated € 18 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Sara Riva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Luke Davis donated € 5 to E-waste Race Germany . Jürg Rohrer donated € 150 to Improved Firewood Stoves (IFS) for Indigenous Families in Guatemala . Errin Saunders donated € 10 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas .

PlanA Newsletter

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Malaysia is located quite close to the equator, and so has a climate typically characterised by heat, rain and humidity. It is, however, a tropical pattern which means that rain falls in big dumps (usually in the afternoon) and in monsoons - so there is still plenty of sunshine to enjoy. The high temperatures are quite stable, typically varying from 25-33°C depending on the time of year. 

Malaysia is quite well protected from natural disaster. Its location means that in many places it is shielded by other land masses from tsunamis and is out of reach of most tropical cyclones. It is also seismically stable, minimising the risk of earthquakes and volcanic activity. The climate and heavy rainfall do, however, mean that flooding and landslides are a persistent problem. In 2006/7, flooding on Johor displaced 110,000 people and caused major economic damage. 

With extensive coastal regions and hundreds of islands, Malaysia is at real risk from sea level rise. The country does not yet have an accurate map of how sea level change will hit its coastal areas, but with many of them less than 0.5 m above sea level, the threat is real. A better understanding of the risks will help target preventative and adaptive measures. Reforestation and development of mangroves along coastlines will create effective natural defences. This is also the case inland: forest cover reduces soil erosion and flood risk - helping to minimise landslides. 

Looking forward with climate change in mind, the success of Malaysia in both human and environmental terms is at risk. In many ways, the human, animal and plant biodiversity are facing the same challenges - and will by conservation efforts. Less than half of the population associate these developing problems with climate change, but as time passes this will be hard to ignore. 

The good news is that, in late 2018, Malaysia announced its plans to draft a climate change act over the next 30 month. It will study scenarios based on a 2°C temperature rise, devising adaptation and prevention measures. With this new focus and international support, we can help Malaysia rise to the challenge of climate change, and find its place in the movement for a more sustainable future. 


THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

DATA INSIGHTS

The World Bank classifies Malaysia as an upper middle-income country. Malaysia's position in the fight against climate change is better understood by observing its historical of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk. The following plots provide an overview of Malaysia’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change. 

Malaysia Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Malaysia’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


Between 1990 and 2000, Malaysia witnessed its emissions fall by 14% as the country’s emissions from the agriculture sector (especially methane emissions from livestock, manure and rice production) were drastically reduced. However, from 2000 to 2009, Malaysia’s emissions increased significantly due to a rise in energy demand (led by rapid economic growth). Malaysia’s emissions continued to rise since 2010 and increased by 40% from its 1990 level. 


In 2012, Malaysia produced nearly 280 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions, which is more than 1.5 times that of neighbouring Philippines (three times populous than Malaysia). The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (76%) of Malaysia’s emissions. A high dependence on fossil fuel heat and electricity production (accounting for over 96% of Malaysia’s energy supply in 2014). As such, Malaysia has the opportunity to curb emissions by transitioning into renewable technologies and start to progressively move away from pricier and less efficient oil fields. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018) 


Malaysia Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Malaysia’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

Malaysia Greenhouse Gas Emissions

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


Between 1990 and 2000, Malaysia witnessed its emissions fall by 14% as the country’s emissions from the agriculture sector (especially methane emissions from livestock, manure and rice production) were drastically reduced. However, from 2000 to 2009, Malaysia’s emissions increased significantly due to a rise in energy demand (led by rapid economic growth). Malaysia’s emissions continued to rise since 2010 and increased by 40% from its 1990 level. 


In 2012, Malaysia produced nearly 280 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions, which is more than 1.5 times that of neighbouring Philippines (three times populous than Malaysia). The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (76%) of Malaysia’s emissions. A high dependence on fossil fuel heat and electricity production (accounting for over 96% of Malaysia’s energy supply in 2014). As such, Malaysia has the opportunity to curb emissions by transitioning into renewable technologies and start to progressively move away from pricier and less efficient oil fields. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018) 


Malaysia Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Malaysia's vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


Relative to the other countries, Malaysia is categorized as the country with manageable vulnerability, yet, lack of preparedness makes it less adaptable to unavoidable climate change consequences. The agricultural capacity of the country is weakening and dependency on food imports is more. Medical staff capacity is poor which impacts the quality of health-related services. There is a constant threat of a sea level rise in Malaysia, and thus a strong commitment to adapt to sea-level rise is required.(Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


Malaysia Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Malaysia's vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

Malaysia Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


Relative to the other countries, Malaysia is categorized as the country with manageable vulnerability, yet, lack of preparedness makes it less adaptable to unavoidable climate change consequences. The agricultural capacity of the country is weakening and dependency on food imports is more. Medical staff capacity is poor which impacts the quality of health-related services. There is a constant threat of a sea level rise in Malaysia, and thus a strong commitment to adapt to sea-level rise is required.(Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


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