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Malaysia

TOTAL POPULATION

30.2 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

240,800 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

14,272,100 kt East Asia and Pacific, YEAR 2014

"Reduce greenhouse gas emissions intensity of GDP by 45% by 2030, relative to 2005."

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

MALAYSIA | ALL PROJECTS

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Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Giorgio Mussi donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Oliver Schwab donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Friederike Gnädinger donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Konstantin Krahtov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Michele Dondi donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Trayan Angelov donated € 11 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Amy McPherson donated € 20 to Giving for Mitigating Climate Change . Andreyana Andreeva-Florian donated € 40 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . joe hasell donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Milena Ivanova donated € 60 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Angel Georgiev donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Bozhana Zagorcheva donated € 5 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Leonardo Gaffuri donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Gianmarco Gallo donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . anna minerva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . marta tosi donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ildiko Milanovich donated € 50 to K'uxiub'al: Sustainable Energy for Healthy Families in San Andrés Itzapa . Ildiko Milanovich donated € 70 to Building an Efficient Technology for Women's Economic Empowerment . Ildiko Milanovich donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ildiko Milanovich donated € 50 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Robert Eckstein donated € 5 to Green Summit: Supporting Young People in Smaller Communities . Mariya Markova donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Francesca Devoto donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . john gaffey donated € 12 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Adi Lazos donated € 22 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Juliana Medaglia donated € 20 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah . FREDERIC ACHARD donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Thalita Medaglia donated € 15 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah . Katie Hereing donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Angelica Seminara donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Nevena Vlaykova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Melanie Bitto donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Cristiano Rocco Marra donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ro Leaver donated € 30 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Phili Denning donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Isabel gregory donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK .

PlanA Newsletter

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Malaysia is located quite close to the equator, and so has a climate typically characterised by heat, rain and humidity. It is, however, a tropical pattern which means that rain falls in big dumps (usually in the afternoon) and in monsoons - so there is still plenty of sunshine to enjoy. The high temperatures are quite stable, typically varying from 25-33°C depending on the time of year. 

Malaysia is quite well protected from natural disaster. Its location means that in many places it is shielded by other land masses from tsunamis and is out of reach of most tropical cyclones. It is also seismically stable, minimising the risk of earthquakes and volcanic activity. The climate and heavy rainfall do, however, mean that flooding and landslides are a persistent problem. In 2006/7, flooding on Johor displaced 110,000 people and caused major economic damage. 

With extensive coastal regions and hundreds of islands, Malaysia is at real risk from sea level rise. The country does not yet have an accurate map of how sea level change will hit its coastal areas, but with many of them less than 0.5 m above sea level, the threat is real. A better understanding of the risks will help target preventative and adaptive measures. Reforestation and development of mangroves along coastlines will create effective natural defences. This is also the case inland: forest cover reduces soil erosion and flood risk - helping to minimise landslides. 

Looking forward with climate change in mind, the success of Malaysia in both human and environmental terms is at risk. In many ways, the human, animal and plant biodiversity are facing the same challenges - and will by conservation efforts. Less than half of the population associate these developing problems with climate change, but as time passes this will be hard to ignore. 

The good news is that, in late 2018, Malaysia announced its plans to draft a climate change act over the next 30 month. It will study scenarios based on a 2°C temperature rise, devising adaptation and prevention measures. With this new focus and international support, we can help Malaysia rise to the challenge of climate change, and find its place in the movement for a more sustainable future. 


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DATA INSIGHTS

The World Bank classifies Malaysia as an upper middle-income country. Malaysia's position in the fight against climate change is better understood by observing its historical of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk. The following plots provide an overview of Malaysia’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change. 

Malaysia Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Malaysia’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


Between 1990 and 2000, Malaysia witnessed its emissions fall by 14% as the country’s emissions from the agriculture sector (especially methane emissions from livestock, manure and rice production) were drastically reduced. However, from 2000 to 2009, Malaysia’s emissions increased significantly due to a rise in energy demand (led by rapid economic growth). Malaysia’s emissions continued to rise since 2010 and increased by 40% from its 1990 level. 


In 2012, Malaysia produced nearly 280 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions, which is more than 1.5 times that of neighbouring Philippines (three times populous than Malaysia). The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (76%) of Malaysia’s emissions. A high dependence on fossil fuel heat and electricity production (accounting for over 96% of Malaysia’s energy supply in 2014). As such, Malaysia has the opportunity to curb emissions by transitioning into renewable technologies and start to progressively move away from pricier and less efficient oil fields. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018) 


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Malaysia Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Malaysia’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

graph

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


Between 1990 and 2000, Malaysia witnessed its emissions fall by 14% as the country’s emissions from the agriculture sector (especially methane emissions from livestock, manure and rice production) were drastically reduced. However, from 2000 to 2009, Malaysia’s emissions increased significantly due to a rise in energy demand (led by rapid economic growth). Malaysia’s emissions continued to rise since 2010 and increased by 40% from its 1990 level. 


In 2012, Malaysia produced nearly 280 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions, which is more than 1.5 times that of neighbouring Philippines (three times populous than Malaysia). The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (76%) of Malaysia’s emissions. A high dependence on fossil fuel heat and electricity production (accounting for over 96% of Malaysia’s energy supply in 2014). As such, Malaysia has the opportunity to curb emissions by transitioning into renewable technologies and start to progressively move away from pricier and less efficient oil fields. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018) 


Malaysia Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Malaysia's vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


Relative to the other countries, Malaysia is categorized as the country with manageable vulnerability, yet, lack of preparedness makes it less adaptable to unavoidable climate change consequences. The agricultural capacity of the country is weakening and dependency on food imports is more. Medical staff capacity is poor which impacts the quality of health-related services. There is a constant threat of a sea level rise in Malaysia, and thus a strong commitment to adapt to sea-level rise is required.(Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


TAKE ACTION

Malaysia Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Malaysia's vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

graph

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


Relative to the other countries, Malaysia is categorized as the country with manageable vulnerability, yet, lack of preparedness makes it less adaptable to unavoidable climate change consequences. The agricultural capacity of the country is weakening and dependency on food imports is more. Medical staff capacity is poor which impacts the quality of health-related services. There is a constant threat of a sea level rise in Malaysia, and thus a strong commitment to adapt to sea-level rise is required.(Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


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MALAYSIA | ALL PROJECTS

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