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Tajikistan

Tajikistan is a Central Asian country and shares borders with Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, China and Kyrgyzstan. The region has a long human history that stretches back to ancient cultures in the Neolithic and Bronze ages. This land has seen a huge range of civilisations, kingdoms and religions. More recently, it was part of the Soviet Union until independence in 1991.


There is an impressive human diversity within this population, a vibrant mix of languages, faiths, cuisine and ways of life. Tajikistan's location in Central Asia, and along the ancient Silk Road network, means that for a long time it has been a melting pot of people and ideas. 


Tajikistan is a truly lofty place. 93% of the country is mountainous and 50% of its land is above 3,000m in altitude. The mighty Pamir range is home to peaks up to almost 7,500m and the Fedchenko Glacier, which is the largest in the world outside of the North and South Poles. This jagged topography is cut through with gorges, valleys and river networks, making Tajikistan a stunning example of an active seismic landscape - although this does, unfortunately, mean quite frequent earthquakes. 


These geographical features also mean an enormous potential for hydropower projects across the country, which could easily supply internal energy demands and provide plenty of power for export to neighbouring countries. This is an important growing aspect of Tajikistan's current economy, which is made largely up of remittances (47%), mostly from Tajiks working in Russia. The country's main exports are aluminium and cotton, which have contributed to steady development for the country. 


After gaining independence, Tajikistan faced a civil war that was a disaster for the country, leaving roughly 100,000 dead and many more as refugees. Governments since then have faced accusations of corruption and human rights abuses from the international community. Tajikistan today has a young and outward-looking population, a great potential for more economic growth that could help many of its people live more better lives. The challenge is to match this development with concern for the environment, and maintaining the nation's spectacular natural beauty.


TOTAL POPULATION

9.1 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

5,200 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

6,245,900 kt Europe and Central Asia, YEAR 2014

“To achieve a 25-35% reduction of GHG emissions compared to 1990 levels by 2030.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

TAJIKISTAN | ALL PROJECTS

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Tajikistan is home to stunning mountain ranges, rivers and lakes (and 8 types of bears). The country has more than 900 rivers (which are longer than 10 km). More than 60% of the water resources of the Central Asia Region, which originate from the high mountain glaciers, are located in the country.  

Wildlife in Tajikistan has a chance to thrive away from human activities. The country is home to an incredible collection of species, with the Asiatic cheetah (critically endangered), Persian leopard (endangered), Snow leopard (vulnerable) and kulan (endangered) in decreasing number. 

Due to development choices dated from the communist era, Tajikistan's agriculture is unadapted to its climate and water reserves. The country still suffers frequent power shortages despite its high hydropower potential. 

The Aral sea has all but disappeared in the last 50 years, essentially due to the irrigation needs of the region’s staple crop: cotton. Demand for agricultural use is extreme, and Tajikistan’s glaciers and icecaps appear like the last available water mass in the region. Tajikistan and other Central Asian nations have to manage the balance between their environment and practises in order to ensure their future as independent and developed countries.

Tajikistan must also provide sufficient energy for its development, whilst not putting in danger its natural resources. Central Asia has got so much to offer to the world, from pristine environments to vibrant cultures. It won’t be forgotten in the fight against climate change.

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DATA INSIGHTS

Tajikistan is classified as a low-income country by the World Bank. The history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk provides useful insights into Tajikistan’s position in the fight against climate change. The following plots give an overview of Tajikistan’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change.


Tajikistan Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Tajikistan’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change since 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2000, Tajikistan witnessed its emissions fall by 54%. In the followed years, however, an increasing emissions trend was observed (increased by 20%). The main driver for the increasing emissions trend was the economic growth and increase in transportation. Overall, Tajikistan’s emissions decreased by 29% between 1990 and 2012. 


In the year 2014, the agriculture and energy sectors (46% and 41%, respectively) served as the predominant source of GHG emissions in Tajikistan. Within the energy sector, the majority of emissions come from fossil fuel mining (coal, natural gas) and energy production. Most agriculture emissions stem from methane produced by livestock.


Although Tajikistan made only a small contribution to GHG emissions in Asia, there is still room for improvement. As fossil fuels combustion and agricultural practices account for the majority of Tajikistan’s emissions, it should be key areas of focus to reduce the country’s emissions (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018; UNFCCC, 2008) 


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Tajikistan Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Tajikistan’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change since 1990

graph

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2000, Tajikistan witnessed its emissions fall by 54%. In the followed years, however, an increasing emissions trend was observed (increased by 20%). The main driver for the increasing emissions trend was the economic growth and increase in transportation. Overall, Tajikistan’s emissions decreased by 29% between 1990 and 2012. 


In the year 2014, the agriculture and energy sectors (46% and 41%, respectively) served as the predominant source of GHG emissions in Tajikistan. Within the energy sector, the majority of emissions come from fossil fuel mining (coal, natural gas) and energy production. Most agriculture emissions stem from methane produced by livestock.


Although Tajikistan made only a small contribution to GHG emissions in Asia, there is still room for improvement. As fossil fuels combustion and agricultural practices account for the majority of Tajikistan’s emissions, it should be key areas of focus to reduce the country’s emissions (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018; UNFCCC, 2008) 


Tajikistan Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Tajikistan’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


Relative to the other countries, Tajikistan is categorised as a country with manageable vulnerability, yet its lack of preparedness makes the country less adapted to the adverse effects of climate change. The agricultural capacity of the country is expected to decrease, leading to more dependence on imports. As its medical staff capacity is also limited, local populations are particularly exposed to disease, wildlife range change and natural disaster damages. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


TAKE ACTION

Tajikistan Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Tajikistan’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

graph

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


Relative to the other countries, Tajikistan is categorised as a country with manageable vulnerability, yet its lack of preparedness makes the country less adapted to the adverse effects of climate change. The agricultural capacity of the country is expected to decrease, leading to more dependence on imports. As its medical staff capacity is also limited, local populations are particularly exposed to disease, wildlife range change and natural disaster damages. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


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