THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

Uganda

Uganda is a landlocked country straddling the equator in East-Central Africa. Most of the action is in the south, where the capital Kampala and most other important cities are found. This is also where Uganda meets Lake Victoria, which is Africa’s largest lake and the world’s second largest freshwater lake.


There is evidence of human activity in the region going back 50-100,000 years, and it has long been an attractive site for settlement and agriculture due to fair weather and reliable rainfall in the Lake Victoria basin. Various kingdoms ruled the area over its history and, of course, the British eventually decided to make an appearance in 1877, when the first Anglican missionaries arrived. The British government created the Ugandan Protectorate in 1894, in order to protect their interests in the major trade route of the River Nile (sourced to a large degree by Lake Victoria). 


Uganda gained independence in 1962, becoming a republic and remaining a member of the Commonwealth of Nations. There was a very tumultuous period until 1986 when Yoweri Museveni toppled the existing regime and took power. Museveni is still in charge today and there are plans for his son, Muhoozi Kainerugaba, to succeed him. 


The economy of Uganda is largely based on the export of its wide range of resources, from coffee and fish to base metals and oil. Uganda is a resource-rich country and its economy is growing. However, this has not trickled down to the general population and a large number live in poverty in one of the poorest nations in the world.


Uganda has much to offer tourists, with a vast biodiversity and some of the most amazing species on earth - including mountain gorillas, elephant, hippos, and 100s of bird species. Tourism is a major contributor to the economy, and so conservation efforts are incredibly important. There are 60 protected areas that are home to many endangered species and a range of national parks. The challenge is maintaining the protection of these precious areas from the demands of a growing population, economy and industry. 

TOTAL POPULATION

38.8 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

5,200 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

822,800 kt Sub-Saharan Africa, YEAR 2014

“Commits to a series of mitigation policies that it says will cut emissions by 22% by 2030 compared to business-as-usual levels.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

UGANDA | ALL PROJECTS

swipe to see more

john gaffey donated € 12 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Adi Lazos donated € 22 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Juliana Medaglia donated € 20 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. FREDERIC ACHARD donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Thalita Medaglia donated € 15 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. Katie Hereing donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Angelica Seminara donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Nevena Vlaykova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Melanie Bitto donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Cristiano Rocco Marra donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ro Leaver donated € 30 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Phili Denning donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Isabel gregory donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Akshay Pai donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Emma Burnett donated € 50 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Boyan Mihaylov donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. François Leclerc donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Clara Hermansson donated € 40 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Peter Thompson donated € 10 to Environmental Protection through Greenery and Awareness Interventions in Kabul and Wardak. Vihra Dincheva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Kris Bertens donated € 50 to Educating Montenegro's New Generation to Break Free from Litter and Plastic. Anna Lupanova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Simona Dakova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Neicho Rahnev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Pavel Boev donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Francesco Zanetto donated € 60 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Hind Alsalloom donated € 50 to Iraqi Youth Climate Change Movement. Francesca Cardani donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Michele Frison donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Fabio Sai donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Paola Tresca donated € 27 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Andrea Mongiello donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Matteo Masi donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Massimo Sacco donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ananda Nidhi donated € 20 to Toranam: Strengthening Agroforestry in Andhra Pradesh. andrea borsetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. ALESSIO GIANNONI donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Laura Zorzetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Rossana Mattachini donated € 20 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Elsa De Grandi donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Agro Eco Village Project in Ri-Bhoi District. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Building an Efficient Technology for Women's Economic Empowerment. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Strengthening Malian Forest Management to Protect Biodiversity and Alleviate Poverty. Noah Silver donated € 30 to Toxic Chemicals and Waste Sensitization for Vulnerable Communities. Stefania Butera donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

PlanA Newsletter

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Like many poorer nations, Uganda is more vulnerable to climate change and less able to rise to its challenges. The country is naturally at risk from floods and droughts, which have impacted on the economy in the past. The increasing severity and unpredictability of extreme weather events make adapting to them very challenging. Uganda is also at the mercy of rising temperatures, with a 1.5°C increase predicted over the next two decades, and a catastrophic 4.3°C forecast by 2080. This may seem like a long way off, but plenty of damage can be done before then. 

Agricultural exports are hugely important to Uganda, and so these issues are all the more pressing. Already a poor country, losing export capacities due to climate change will be disastrous in social and economic terms. The risk is also, of course, to national food security - and the poor will be hit the hardest. A warmer and wetter Uganda also raises the threat of new disease transmissions. The Kabale district has already seen a significant increase in the presence of mosquitoes and corresponding incidences of malaria in the local population, and more frequent flooding exposes local people to cholera. 

To meet the challenges of climate change, Uganda must engage with international support and develop its management of sensitive resources, infrastructure and natural habitats. The Ugandan people are dependent on their environment, and the environment will be a major part of future development and prosperity. 


THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

DATA INSIGHTS

Uganda is classified as a low-income country by the World Bank. Uganda’s position in the fight against climate change is better understood by looking at its history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk. The following plots provide an overview of Uganda’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change.

Uganda Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Uganda’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the dotted line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the full line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 2000 to 2008, Uganda’s emissions dramatically increased by more than 142%. Driven by the economic recession (which affected emissions-intensive industries), Uganda’s emissions decreased from 2008 to 2009. However, they grew in the following year as a result of the economic recovery, representing a 119% increase from its 1990 level. The agriculture sector is responsible for the largest share (48%) of Uganda’s emissions. Within the agriculture sector, the majority of emissions come from methane produced by livestock digestion and manure left on pasture.  


In 2012, Uganda emitted over 80 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHGs, which is 1.5 times more than its neighbouring country Kenya. To reduce the country’s emissions, a transition to sustainable agriculture systems is a key step in Uganda. Changes in farming practices such as improving manure management and fertilizer application can also help reduce the country's emissions. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018) 


TAKE ACTION

Uganda Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Uganda’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

graph

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the dotted line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the full line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 2000 to 2008, Uganda’s emissions dramatically increased by more than 142%. Driven by the economic recession (which affected emissions-intensive industries), Uganda’s emissions decreased from 2008 to 2009. However, they grew in the following year as a result of the economic recovery, representing a 119% increase from its 1990 level. The agriculture sector is responsible for the largest share (48%) of Uganda’s emissions. Within the agriculture sector, the majority of emissions come from methane produced by livestock digestion and manure left on pasture.  


In 2012, Uganda emitted over 80 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHGs, which is 1.5 times more than its neighbouring country Kenya. To reduce the country’s emissions, a transition to sustainable agriculture systems is a key step in Uganda. Changes in farming practices such as improving manure management and fertilizer application can also help reduce the country's emissions. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018) 


Uganda Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Uganda’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right. 


Uganda is categorised as a country with high vulnerability to climate change impacts and a low level of adaptation capacity. Agricultural yields are forecasted to decline significantly under projected climate change. Climate change is expected to lead to declined rainfall that causes more extreme droughts, thereby threatening the water security of the country. A rise in temperature due to climate change also increases vulnerability on forests and biodiversity. In order to respond to climate-related disasters, enhancing the resilience and adaptive capacity of response systems is also inevitable. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


TAKE ACTION

Uganda Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Uganda’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

graph

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right. 


Uganda is categorised as a country with high vulnerability to climate change impacts and a low level of adaptation capacity. Agricultural yields are forecasted to decline significantly under projected climate change. Climate change is expected to lead to declined rainfall that causes more extreme droughts, thereby threatening the water security of the country. A rise in temperature due to climate change also increases vulnerability on forests and biodiversity. In order to respond to climate-related disasters, enhancing the resilience and adaptive capacity of response systems is also inevitable. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


Share this page

BE ONE OF THE GOOD GUYS...

UGANDA | ALL PROJECTS

swipe to see more

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET