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Brazil

Who has never dreamed of chilling on the beaches of Copacabana, meeting the famous girl from Ipanema, or boating the legendary Amazon upriver? The fifth largest country in terms of size and population occupies the upper-eastern half of South America. 


Brazil shares borders with Venezuela, Colombia, all of the Guyanas, Argentina, Bolivia, Peru and Paraguay. Except for Chile and Ecuador, Brazil touches every other country in South America. Its economy is diversified and relies on a powerful agricultural sector, a growing industry, financial services and a highly-connected population. 


In 2002, the Trabalhador (Labour) party led by Lula took power for the first time (in Brazilian history!). During these times, great social and economic progress was achieved, taking more than 20 million Brazilians out of poverty and reducing the country dependency on its natural resources. Lula’s successor, Dilma Rousseff, was impeached in 2015 following her implication in the largest corruption scandal in history (in terms of quantities of money and number of politicians involved). The state petrol company Petrobras, it was discovered, served as secret funds to finance election campaigns of both the left and right-wing parties.


This caused widespread outrage and further disenchantment in the already strained population. In October 2018, the far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro won the presidential elections on the basis of a populist rhetoric in a style we are beginning to recognise. Some challenges have yet to be addressed in Brazil. Extreme poverty is still very much a reality of both urban and rural populations, welfare and public education are defunded (if they were funded at any point), and narco-trafficking has triggered a state of protracted civil conflict between outlaws, the police and paramilitary groups that no one can keep in check. 


Its formidable natural settings, as well as its legendary joy, will be the way out of this cul-de-sac. Embora Brazil, o Mundo enteiro ta olhando!

TOTAL POPULATION

204.2 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

529,800 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

1,912,500 kt Latin America and the Caribbean, YEAR 2014

“To reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 37% below 2005 levels in 2025.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

BRAZIL | ALL PROJECTS

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john gaffey donated € 12 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Adi Lazos donated € 22 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Juliana Medaglia donated € 20 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. FREDERIC ACHARD donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Thalita Medaglia donated € 15 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. Katie Hereing donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Angelica Seminara donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Nevena Vlaykova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Melanie Bitto donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Cristiano Rocco Marra donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ro Leaver donated € 30 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Phili Denning donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Isabel gregory donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Akshay Pai donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Emma Burnett donated € 50 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Boyan Mihaylov donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. François Leclerc donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Clara Hermansson donated € 40 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Peter Thompson donated € 10 to Environmental Protection through Greenery and Awareness Interventions in Kabul and Wardak. Vihra Dincheva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Kris Bertens donated € 50 to Educating Montenegro's New Generation to Break Free from Litter and Plastic. Anna Lupanova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Simona Dakova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Neicho Rahnev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Pavel Boev donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Francesco Zanetto donated € 60 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Hind Alsalloom donated € 50 to Iraqi Youth Climate Change Movement. Francesca Cardani donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Michele Frison donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Fabio Sai donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Paola Tresca donated € 27 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Andrea Mongiello donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Matteo Masi donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Massimo Sacco donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ananda Nidhi donated € 20 to Toranam: Strengthening Agroforestry in Andhra Pradesh. andrea borsetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. ALESSIO GIANNONI donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Laura Zorzetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Rossana Mattachini donated € 20 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Elsa De Grandi donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Agro Eco Village Project in Ri-Bhoi District. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Building an Efficient Technology for Women's Economic Empowerment. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Strengthening Malian Forest Management to Protect Biodiversity and Alleviate Poverty. Noah Silver donated € 30 to Toxic Chemicals and Waste Sensitization for Vulnerable Communities. Stefania Butera donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Brazil is well-known to environmentalists. It has the largest forest on the planet and the highest number of species recorded. It is estimated that Brazil holds 15-20% of the world’s biodiversity, but it’s hard to keep tabs: more than 700 new species are discovered each year.

Brazil’s huge territory goes beyond the Amazon forest. Many other ecosystems - from the dry cerrado (a savanna-like environment) to the wetlands of Pantanal where the sacred Jaguars roam - participate to the country’s natural wealth. It’s estimated that at least 4 million species coexist in Brazil, and we are lucky to be one of them. 

As a deeply diverse country, each region in Brazil faces different environmental challenges, from waste management to fish stock overexploitation, but one issue transcends them all. Since the arrival of Europeans and their sedentary way of life, deforestation has reached alarming levels. The Atlantic rainforest for example (a jungle that ran along most of its 7,500 km long shoreline) is down its last 5% of remaining trees. 

As the thickest forest in the world, the Amazon still represents a huge reservoir for wildlife and habitat. On the other hand, it has been destroyed on the fringes by cattling, agriculture, extractive activities and at its heart through resettlement, hydropower and illegal poaching and logging. The new president Bolsonaro has announced his intent to denounce the Paris Agreement and open the green lungs of the world to all sorts of destructive human activities. Already, Brazil has renounced to hosting the COP25, the world’s yearly meeting on climate action. 

 Our partners on the ground are fighting. They need your help to have the impact they need to have in this key battleground country. Pick up your vuvuzela, your cuica or your berimbau, and tell the whole world you stand behind the Pais Tropical!

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DATA INSIGHTS

Brazil is classified as an upper-middle-income country by the World Bank. The history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk provides useful insights into Brazil’s position in the fight against climate change.  The following plots give an overview of Brazil’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s climate action and sustainability performance.

 

Brazil Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Brazil’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change since 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the dotted line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the full line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2000, Brazil’s emissions declined by 24%. After fluctuations in emissions (due to CO2 emissions and removals, particularly in the land-use change and forestry sector), Brazil’s emissions more than doubled in one year alone (2009-2010) and have remained stable at this level since. 


Overall, Brazil’s GHG emissions increased by 86% from 1990 to 2012. Brazil’s emissions are dominated by the energy and agriculture sectors (37% and 32% of 2014 emissions, respectively). The largest sources of Brazil’s energy emissions come from burning fossil fuels for transportation. 


In 2012, Brazil emitted almost 3 billion tonnes CO2 eq. GHG emissions, which is more than a half of all GHG emissions in Latin America and the Caribbean. As Brazil is among the world’s top ten GHG emitting countries, it needs to enhance emissions mitigation efforts by reducing emissions from transportation as well as by regulating unsustainable land use and deforestation. (Source: WRI, 2018; World bank, 2018)

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Brazil Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Brazil’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change since 1990

graph

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the dotted line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the full line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2000, Brazil’s emissions declined by 24%. After fluctuations in emissions (due to CO2 emissions and removals, particularly in the land-use change and forestry sector), Brazil’s emissions more than doubled in one year alone (2009-2010) and have remained stable at this level since. 


Overall, Brazil’s GHG emissions increased by 86% from 1990 to 2012. Brazil’s emissions are dominated by the energy and agriculture sectors (37% and 32% of 2014 emissions, respectively). The largest sources of Brazil’s energy emissions come from burning fossil fuels for transportation. 


In 2012, Brazil emitted almost 3 billion tonnes CO2 eq. GHG emissions, which is more than a half of all GHG emissions in Latin America and the Caribbean. As Brazil is among the world’s top ten GHG emitting countries, it needs to enhance emissions mitigation efforts by reducing emissions from transportation as well as by regulating unsustainable land use and deforestation. (Source: WRI, 2018; World bank, 2018)

Brazil Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

Brazil’s performance on sustainable development

The SDG Index describes a country’s progress towards achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGI combines indicators of climate action with other socio-economic development measures that contextualise a country’s environmental performance with the rest of its challenges and reality. 


The global SDG Index score can be interpreted as the percentage of achievement of the goals. Each dot in the plot represents a country and its score (y-axis). Countries at the bottom score lower than the countries at the top. Sweden currently scores the highest at 85 and the Central African Republic scores lowest at 38.


Brazil’s score of 70 is slightly above the average of South American countries. Brazil performs well in the domain of renewable and affordable energy (generating more than 70% of its electricity from renewable resources). However, the country still falls short of addressing many aspects of sustainable development. This is mainly because Brazil performs poorly on measures like reducing emissions from deforestation and unsustainable patterns of consumption and production. (Source: SDGI, 2018) 


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.

TAKE ACTION

Brazil Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

Brazil’s performance on sustainable development

graph

The SDG Index describes a country’s progress towards achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGI combines indicators of climate action with other socio-economic development measures that contextualise a country’s environmental performance with the rest of its challenges and reality. 


The global SDG Index score can be interpreted as the percentage of achievement of the goals. Each dot in the plot represents a country and its score (y-axis). Countries at the bottom score lower than the countries at the top. Sweden currently scores the highest at 85 and the Central African Republic scores lowest at 38.


Brazil’s score of 70 is slightly above the average of South American countries. Brazil performs well in the domain of renewable and affordable energy (generating more than 70% of its electricity from renewable resources). However, the country still falls short of addressing many aspects of sustainable development. This is mainly because Brazil performs poorly on measures like reducing emissions from deforestation and unsustainable patterns of consumption and production. (Source: SDGI, 2018) 


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.

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BRAZIL | ALL PROJECTS

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