THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

Cameroon

Cameroon is located in Central Western Africa on the Gulf of Guinea. It is comparable in size with Spain. It is a hugely varied country both in terms of landscapes culture, counting more than 250 different ways of life and customs. It shares borders with Nigeria, Chad, Central African Republic, Congo and Equatorial Guinea. It is as large as California.


Cameroon has long been inhabited by Baka tribes (known to Europeans as pygmies) who were hunter-gatherers in the Congo basin jungle. Portuguese navigators who discovered the mouth of the Wouri River (the second largest in the country) and, noticing the abundant population of shrimps, simply called it Rio dos Camarões. This name, in turn, became Cameroon and gave its name to the country today.

 

The region of Cameroon was progressively colonised by trade posts and missionaries until 1884 when Germany claimed the territory of “Kamerun”. At the end of the First World War, it was partitioned between a French-speaking and an English-speaking entity, whose relations are tense today due to a deficit in representativity and a lack of decentralisation.


National points of pride include Makossa, a music mixing soul and Congolese beats, Roger Milla, the inventor of the goal celebration in football, and the 300+ languages spoken in the country in peace. 


The country gained its independence back in 1972. Despite a severe economic crisis in the late 1980s, Cameroon managed to make its economy one of the most diversified in Africa. Cameroon has managed to lower its external debt to under 10% of its GDP, an exception in Sub-Saharan Africa. 


70% of the population is still employed in agriculture. Cameroon exports varied high-value crops like bananas, cocoa or coffee. It’s also a significant petrol exporter (a good that represents over 35% of its export value). Still, a quarter of Cameroonians still live in chronic poverty. The sustainable transition is an opportunity to transform the country’s rich resources from a means of survival to a source of wealth.


TOTAL POPULATION

22.4 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

7,000 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

822,800 kt Sub-Saharan Africa, YEAR 2014

“A 32% reduction in emissions by 2035 compared to business-as-usual levels.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

CAMEROON | ALL PROJECTS

swipe to see more

john gaffey donated € 12 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Adi Lazos donated € 22 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Juliana Medaglia donated € 20 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. FREDERIC ACHARD donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Thalita Medaglia donated € 15 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. Katie Hereing donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Angelica Seminara donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Nevena Vlaykova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Melanie Bitto donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Cristiano Rocco Marra donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ro Leaver donated € 30 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Phili Denning donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Isabel gregory donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Akshay Pai donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Emma Burnett donated € 50 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Boyan Mihaylov donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. François Leclerc donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Clara Hermansson donated € 40 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Peter Thompson donated € 10 to Environmental Protection through Greenery and Awareness Interventions in Kabul and Wardak. Vihra Dincheva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Kris Bertens donated € 50 to Educating Montenegro's New Generation to Break Free from Litter and Plastic. Anna Lupanova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Simona Dakova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Neicho Rahnev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Pavel Boev donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Francesco Zanetto donated € 60 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Hind Alsalloom donated € 50 to Iraqi Youth Climate Change Movement. Francesca Cardani donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Michele Frison donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Fabio Sai donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Paola Tresca donated € 27 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Andrea Mongiello donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Matteo Masi donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Massimo Sacco donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ananda Nidhi donated € 20 to Toranam: Strengthening Agroforestry in Andhra Pradesh. andrea borsetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. ALESSIO GIANNONI donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Laura Zorzetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Rossana Mattachini donated € 20 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Elsa De Grandi donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Agro Eco Village Project in Ri-Bhoi District. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Building an Efficient Technology for Women's Economic Empowerment. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Strengthening Malian Forest Management to Protect Biodiversity and Alleviate Poverty. Noah Silver donated € 30 to Toxic Chemicals and Waste Sensitization for Vulnerable Communities. Stefania Butera donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

PlanA Newsletter

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

The unique climate and terrain conditions in Cameroon have granted the country with a manifold biodiversity. The country counts at least 1660 types of species, including 900 birds, lions, elephants and giraffe. Bonus, it is the home of the Goliath frog, the biggest of them all. 

Deforestation from agriculture is an enduring problem in Cameroon. The forests recede by 0.90% yearly on average. At this rate, there won’t be any forest left in 50 years. Commercial bushmeat trade has now surpassed deforestation as the main threat to wildlife in Cameroon. Only 5% of Cameroon is protected when the UN targets 17% globally. Two of these parks nonetheless are World UNESCO heritage sites for their biodiversity significance and the natural beauty of the landscape.

Cameroon has at least 2 active volcanoes, including the eponymous Mount Cameroon. While not gushing lava, they periodically release poisonous gases through the lakes that formed on their craters. 

The great challenge for Cameroon is to limit the damage done to its natural treasures - and defences - such as its coastal mangrove, whilst getting to food self-sufficiency, end extreme poverty and provide livelihoods to all its citizens. The two do not oppose but complement each other.


THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

DATA INSIGHTS

The World Bank classifies Cameroon as a lower-middle-income country. To understand Cameroon’s position in the fight against climate change, it is useful to observe its history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk. The following plots provide an overview of Cameroon’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change.

Cameroon Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Cameroon’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the dotted line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the full line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2000, Cameroon’s emissions increased by 67%, driven mainly by the expansion of export-oriented industrial agriculture. However, Cameroon’s emissions decreased from 2000 to 2010 as the use of petroleum-derived fuels for an energy source declined and brought its emissions down to nearly 1990 levels in 2012.


Land-use change and forestry (LUCF) sector are responsible for the largest share (58%), followed by the industrial processes sector (30%). LUCF emissions are mainly due to the transformation of forest lands into logging grounds and the expansion of agricultural activities. The industrial-related emissions come from the combustion of fossil fuels in industry. 


In 2012, Cameroon made a small contribution to GHG emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. Cameroon still requires further efforts such as regulating unsustainable land use and illegal logging. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)


TAKE ACTION

Cameroon Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Cameroon’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

graph

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the dotted line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the full line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2000, Cameroon’s emissions increased by 67%, driven mainly by the expansion of export-oriented industrial agriculture. However, Cameroon’s emissions decreased from 2000 to 2010 as the use of petroleum-derived fuels for an energy source declined and brought its emissions down to nearly 1990 levels in 2012.


Land-use change and forestry (LUCF) sector are responsible for the largest share (58%), followed by the industrial processes sector (30%). LUCF emissions are mainly due to the transformation of forest lands into logging grounds and the expansion of agricultural activities. The industrial-related emissions come from the combustion of fossil fuels in industry. 


In 2012, Cameroon made a small contribution to GHG emissions in Sub-Saharan Africa. Cameroon still requires further efforts such as regulating unsustainable land use and illegal logging. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)


Cameroon Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Cameroon’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right. 


Cameroon falls under the high vulnerability to climate change low level of adaptation capacity category. As agricultural is prone to climate change, extreme weather events will have significant impacts on the country’s agricultural production and food security. Climate change is expected to lead to declined rainfall that causes more extreme droughts, thereby threatening the water security of the country. The resilience and adaptive capacity of response systems need to be strengthened to effectively adapt to climate-related disasters. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


TAKE ACTION

Cameroon Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Cameroon’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

graph

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right. 


Cameroon falls under the high vulnerability to climate change low level of adaptation capacity category. As agricultural is prone to climate change, extreme weather events will have significant impacts on the country’s agricultural production and food security. Climate change is expected to lead to declined rainfall that causes more extreme droughts, thereby threatening the water security of the country. The resilience and adaptive capacity of response systems need to be strengthened to effectively adapt to climate-related disasters. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


Share this page

BE ONE OF THE GOOD GUYS...

CAMEROON | ALL PROJECTS

swipe to see more

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET