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Fiji

TOTAL POPULATION

0.88 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

1,200 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

14,272,100 kt East Asia and Pacific, YEAR 2014

“A conditional 30% reduction in GHG emissions and 100% renewable electricity by 2030.” 


PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

FIJI | ALL PROJECTS

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Konstantinos Dimitriadis donated € 5 to Help Build Eco-Friendly Homes for Rural Communities in India . Manon Steiner donated € 15 to Help Rwandan Cities Control Waste and Stay Clean . Bart van den Heuvel donated € 25 to Recycled Electronics for German School Children . Prateek Gogineni donated € 30 to Promote Clean Agroforestry in Rural India . Lluis Mateu donated € 50 to Bringing Back Forests In Kenya . Renato Anselmi Ricci donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,300 to E-waste Race Germany . Kiki Beck donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,500 to E-waste Race Germany . Farah Piryeva donated € 200 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ruggero Lambertini donated € 75 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Iren Dikova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Luke Farrelly donated € 120 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Andrey Bankovski donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Kalina Zhechkova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Anton Batchvarov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stivian Valchev donated € 35 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Tatyana Mitkova donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . NELIA VATEVA donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Kitov donated € 25 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Ivaylo Vasilev donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Winkler donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Valeriia Muliukova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Francesca bianchi donated € 100 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stephanie van groenendael donated € 40 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Judith de Warren donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . nat Bonnisseau donated € 1 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Luke Davis donated € 10 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stanislav Stoev donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Nathan Bonnisseau donated € 18 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Sara Riva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Luke Davis donated € 5 to E-waste Race Germany . Jürg Rohrer donated € 150 to Improved Firewood Stoves (IFS) for Indigenous Families in Guatemala . Errin Saunders donated € 10 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas .

PlanA Newsletter

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

A large number of Fijian islets are at risk of washing into the sea. Soil erosion and rapid sea-level rise could affect more than half of the islands that make up the archipelago. The majority of the land is, however, on volcanic islands that rise to well over 1,000 meters in elevation.

Fijian cultures places great value on the vanua, the land to which they belong. It hosts an impressive selection of birds and lizards. The fantastic musk parrot cohabitates with the crested iguana, one of the (critically endangered) symbols of the country. The aptly-named Rainbow Coral reef and its 1,200 fish species are also located within Fijian territorial waters and ensure massive fish resources. However, coral bleaching has already reduced the size of global coral reefs by at least 50%.

The island’s extensive timber, rich soils, mineral deposits also provide means of economic development but also heightens the risk of exploitation and natural destruction on an island that needs to be very carefully managed to stay within the viability thresholds. 

Human development has gone down in the Fiji islands, despite a steady growth in its economy. Sustainable action can maintain Fijians’ living standards and even offer new alleys of development in fishing, tourism and agriculture, just to name a few.

Fiji, alongside its neighbouring islands in the Pacific, is taking an aggressive stance on climate change. People have observed the change in their ocean. A change that has become visible over the span of a single human generation. 


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DATA INSIGHTS

The World Bank classifies Fiji as an upper middle-income country. To understand Fiji’s situation with regards to climate change, its history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk over time are insightful. The following graphs show Fiji’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change.

Fiji Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Fiji’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change since 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


At -32% compared to 1990 levels in 2000, Fiji saw its emissions bounce back between 2000 - 2008. This sharp increasing trend was due to a rise in the use of imported fossil fuels. Back at equal levels in 2009, it has since then managed to curb slightly its emissions (-3%). Fiji’s emissions represent less than 0.1% of global emissions both in 2018 and historically.


In Fiji, the energy sector is the leading source of emissions accounting for 48% of total emissions, followed by the agriculture sector (40%). Fiji’s energy emissions are dominated by the use of fossil fuels in transportation and electricity generation. 


To reduce the country’s emissions, Fiji requires governmental action such as shifting the fossil-fuel dominated system towards renewable energy solutions and improving agricultural management. (Source: WRI, 2018; World bank, 2018)


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Fiji Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Fiji’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change since 1990

Fiji Greenhouse Gas Emissions

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


At -32% compared to 1990 levels in 2000, Fiji saw its emissions bounce back between 2000 - 2008. This sharp increasing trend was due to a rise in the use of imported fossil fuels. Back at equal levels in 2009, it has since then managed to curb slightly its emissions (-3%). Fiji’s emissions represent less than 0.1% of global emissions both in 2018 and historically.


In Fiji, the energy sector is the leading source of emissions accounting for 48% of total emissions, followed by the agriculture sector (40%). Fiji’s energy emissions are dominated by the use of fossil fuels in transportation and electricity generation. 


To reduce the country’s emissions, Fiji requires governmental action such as shifting the fossil-fuel dominated system towards renewable energy solutions and improving agricultural management. (Source: WRI, 2018; World bank, 2018)


Fiji Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Fiji’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right. 


Fiji is categorized as a country with high vulnerability and fairly effective responsiveness to climate change. However, there is a greater need to strengthen the adaptation capacity. Rice and wheat production are forecasted to decline significantly under projected climate change. Decrease in precipitation due to climate change is expected to lead to longer drought periods, which can paralyse the agriculture capacity and food security of the country. This island nation is also threatened by sea-level rise and hurricanes due to reduced natural defences damaged by deforestation and coral bleaching. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


TAKE ACTION

Fiji Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

Fiji’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

Fiji Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right. 


Fiji is categorized as a country with high vulnerability and fairly effective responsiveness to climate change. However, there is a greater need to strengthen the adaptation capacity. Rice and wheat production are forecasted to decline significantly under projected climate change. Decrease in precipitation due to climate change is expected to lead to longer drought periods, which can paralyse the agriculture capacity and food security of the country. This island nation is also threatened by sea-level rise and hurricanes due to reduced natural defences damaged by deforestation and coral bleaching. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


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