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Guatemala

TOTAL POPULATION

15.9 million YEAR 2014

CO₂ EMISSIONS

18,300 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

1,912,500 kt Latin America and the Caribbean, YEAR 2014

“An unconditional 11.2% emissions cut in 2030, relative to business as usual projections, or a conditional 22.6% reduction.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011
PlanA Newsletter

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Guatemala is an incredibly diverse country. It is part of the Mesoamerican biodiversity hotspot which is home to 7% of the world’s total biodiversity (on 0.1% of the surface of the world). The region is also part of the Pacific Fire Belt, which is a geologically active zone of volcanoes.

Some endangered members of the Guatemalan wildlife family include the West Indian manatee, Guatemalan black howler, Nelson’s spiny pocket mouse, Maya mouse, Derby’s woolly opossum, all wonderfully interesting creatures, with pretty cool names.

Guatemala has 37 volcanoes (4 of them active) and 2 mountain ranges on its territory. This rugged terrain combined with dry and wet rainforests forms diverse ecosystems that support this rich biodiversity and wealth. 

However, deforestation in Guatemala is high. It is essentially due to slash and burn agriculture (79% of lost woodlands), livestock clearing (10%) and commercial agriculture (0.5%). Dry forests are progressively replacing tropical rainforests, which has already started modifying the local climate, and thus the habits of local species, humans included.

Since 1970, the average annual rainfall has increased by 13 - 27% across the country. According to previous observations and models, higher temperatures and more variable rainfall will increase the risk of food and water insecurity among the most vulnerable populations, particularly indigenous groups, subsistence farmers in remote locations, and coastal zones. Indigenous people represent 40% of the country’s population. 

Guatemala has an environment to protect. Climate-related loss and damage over the past 16 years total $3.5 billion. Exposed as it is by its geological and social situation, the country has to create its own way to sustainability, one which involves all people from all origins. The Mayans have gotten it wrong one time with the end of the world, but maybe they can show us the beginning of a new one?

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DATA INSIGHTS

Guatemala is ranked as an upper middle-income country by the World Bank.  To get a sense of Guatemala’s position in the fight against climate change, it is vital to observe its history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk. The following plots provide an overview of Mexico’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change.

Guatemala Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Guatemala’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

Guatemala Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Guatemala’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

Guatemala Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Guatemala Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI) per country

Guatemala’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

Guatemala Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI) per country

Guatemala’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

Guatemala Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI) per country
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