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Germany

TOTAL POPULATION

80.9 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

719,900 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

3,241,800 kt European Union, YEAR 2014

“A 40% domestic reduction in greenhouse gases by 2030 compared to 1990 levels.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

GERMANY | ALL PROJECTS

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Luke Farrelly donated € 120 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Andrey Bankovski donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Kalina Zhechkova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Anton Batchvarov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stivian Valchev donated € 35 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Tatyana Mitkova donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . NELIA VATEVA donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Kitov donated € 25 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Ivaylo Vasilev donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Winkler donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Valeriia Muliukova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Francesca bianchi donated € 100 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stephanie van groenendael donated € 40 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Judith de Warren donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . nat Bonnisseau donated € 1 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Luke Davis donated € 10 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stanislav Stoev donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Nathan Bonnisseau donated € 18 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Sara Riva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Luke Davis donated € 5 to E-waste Race Germany . Jürg Rohrer donated € 150 to Improved Firewood Stoves (IFS) for Indigenous Families in Guatemala . Errin Saunders donated € 10 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Giorgio Mussi donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Oliver Schwab donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Friederike Gnädinger donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Konstantin Krahtov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Michele Dondi donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Trayan Angelov donated € 11 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Amy McPherson donated € 20 to Giving for Mitigating Climate Change . Andreyana Andreeva-Florian donated € 40 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . joe hasell donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK . Milena Ivanova donated € 60 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Angel Georgiev donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Bozhana Zagorcheva donated € 5 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Leonardo Gaffuri donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Gianmarco Gallo donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles .

PlanA Newsletter

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

Germany is a serious economic powerhouse, and influential across the world. It is the 3rd largest exporter and has the 4th largest GDP. For these reasons, the nation must help lead the way to a greener future by setting standards and showing the world what must be done. 

Whilst Germany is safe from the natural disasters that impact much of the world, it cannot escape the changing climate. 2018 brought the driest spring and summer on record, seriously impacting agricultural yields and bringing the reality of global warming, home. The population, however, does not need convincing - and Germany’s federal and local governments have a tendency to back local green initiatives. This is one of the reasons why Plan A decided to place its HQ in Berlin, right next to an ecological urban farming garden. 

Thanks to a dense network of organisations and individuals, Berlin (the capital) is a worldwide centre for circular economy, social impact startups, and green business initiatives. Germany is getting ready to become a model of sustainable development. They are proof that change will come from an intelligent cooperation between civil society, individuals and governments. 

The challenge moving forward is to address inherent contradictions in energy policy. The nation is anti-nuclear, which makes meeting greenhouse gas emission reductions challenging, and is at odds with the UN’s position that nuclear has a major role to play in the transition to a sustainable future. Germany must find a way to balance its powerful industry with green energy, keeping industrialists and environmentalist happy - and protecting our planet.  

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

DATA INSIGHTS

Germany is a high-income country according to the World Bank classification. The history of carbon emissions and exposure to climate risk provides useful insights into Germany's position in the fight against climate change. The following plots provide an overview of Germany’s historic greenhouse gas emissions in perspective with global emission levels, as well as the country’s climate action and sustainability performance.

Germany Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Germany’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change since 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2012, Germany’s emissions dropped by 24%. This declining trend in emissions was led by an increased use of renewable energy sources and the decline in industrial energy consumption. Nevertheless, the energy sector in Germany remains the largest share (84% as of 2014) of its emissions. This is primarily due to a high dependence on fossil fuel energy generation (accounting for 79% of Germany’s energy supply in 2014). 


Despite a decreasing trend in emissions, Germany still produced over 950 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions in 2012 (the largest emitter in the European Union). This is equivalent to the amount of CO2 being absorbed annually by 4.5 million km2 of forest (1.3 times the size of Germany). Although Germany is considered a role model for GHG emissions reduction, the country requires further reductions in emissions to meet the stated targets - cutting emissions by 40% by 2030 compared to 1990 levels. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)


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Germany Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Germany’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change since 1990

Germany Greenhouse Gas Emissions

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


From 1990 to 2012, Germany’s emissions dropped by 24%. This declining trend in emissions was led by an increased use of renewable energy sources and the decline in industrial energy consumption. Nevertheless, the energy sector in Germany remains the largest share (84% as of 2014) of its emissions. This is primarily due to a high dependence on fossil fuel energy generation (accounting for 79% of Germany’s energy supply in 2014). 


Despite a decreasing trend in emissions, Germany still produced over 950 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions in 2012 (the largest emitter in the European Union). This is equivalent to the amount of CO2 being absorbed annually by 4.5 million km2 of forest (1.3 times the size of Germany). Although Germany is considered a role model for GHG emissions reduction, the country requires further reductions in emissions to meet the stated targets - cutting emissions by 40% by 2030 compared to 1990 levels. (Source: WRI, 2018; World Bank, 2018)


Germany Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

Germany’s performance on sustainable development

The SDG Index describes a country’s progress towards achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGI combines indicators of climate action with other socio-economic development measures that contextualise a country’s environmental performance with the rest of its challenges and reality. 


The global SDG Index score can be interpreted as the percentage of achievement of the goals


Each dot in the plot represents a country and its score (y-axis). Countries at the bottom score lower on the index as the countries at the top. Sweden currently scores the highest at 85 and the Central African Republic scores lowest at 38.


Germany’s score of 82 is above the average of Western European countries. Germany performs well in several areas including renewable energy, water supply and sanitation and maintaining biodiversity. Despite being the front-runners in adapting the SDGs, Germany still needs to address issues, such as energy-related CO2 emissions and unsustainable patterns of consumption and production. (Source: SDGI, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


TAKE ACTION

Germany Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

Germany’s performance on sustainable development

Germany Sustainable Development Goals Index (SDGI)

The SDG Index describes a country’s progress towards achieving the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGI combines indicators of climate action with other socio-economic development measures that contextualise a country’s environmental performance with the rest of its challenges and reality. 


The global SDG Index score can be interpreted as the percentage of achievement of the goals


Each dot in the plot represents a country and its score (y-axis). Countries at the bottom score lower on the index as the countries at the top. Sweden currently scores the highest at 85 and the Central African Republic scores lowest at 38.


Germany’s score of 82 is above the average of Western European countries. Germany performs well in several areas including renewable energy, water supply and sanitation and maintaining biodiversity. Despite being the front-runners in adapting the SDGs, Germany still needs to address issues, such as energy-related CO2 emissions and unsustainable patterns of consumption and production. (Source: SDGI, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys.


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