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India

TOTAL POPULATION

1,290 million YEAR 2014

CO2 EMISSIONS

2,238,400 kt COUNTRY, YEAR 2014

2,516,400 kt South Asia, YEAR 2014

“A 33-35% reduction in emissions intensity by 2030, compared to 2005 levels.”

PARIS AGREEMENT TARGET

Created by potrace 1.10, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2011

INDIA | ALL PROJECTS

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Lluis Mateu donated € 50 to Bringing Back Forests In Kenya . Renato Anselmi Ricci donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,300 to E-waste Race Germany . Kiki Beck donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,500 to E-waste Race Germany . Farah Piryeva donated € 200 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ruggero Lambertini donated € 75 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Iren Dikova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Luke Farrelly donated € 120 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Andrey Bankovski donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Kalina Zhechkova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Anton Batchvarov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stivian Valchev donated € 35 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Tatyana Mitkova donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . NELIA VATEVA donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Kitov donated € 25 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Ivaylo Vasilev donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Winkler donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Valeriia Muliukova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Francesca bianchi donated € 100 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stephanie van groenendael donated € 40 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Judith de Warren donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . nat Bonnisseau donated € 1 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Luke Davis donated € 10 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stanislav Stoev donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Nathan Bonnisseau donated € 18 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Sara Riva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Luke Davis donated € 5 to E-waste Race Germany . Jürg Rohrer donated € 150 to Improved Firewood Stoves (IFS) for Indigenous Families in Guatemala . Errin Saunders donated € 10 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Giorgio Mussi donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Oliver Schwab donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Friederike Gnädinger donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Konstantin Krahtov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas .

PlanA Newsletter

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CLIMATE SIGNIFICANCE

India has become one of the world’s industrial hubs in a little more than 3 decades. Electronics, naval construction, steel manufacturing and other plants have dotted the map and brought hundreds of thousands of jobs to cities that have developed too fast to provide for much of the basic services to its populations. 


India’s ability to respond to climate change challenges is compromised by poor or obsolete waste management infrastructures (human, chemical, industrial and domestic) and the magnitude of the endeavour to transition a country of this size towards sustainability, all the while acting on an imperative to preserve its biodiversity. But the population is calling for environmental change. Indian rivers and cities cannot take much more and climate casualties, from pollution, contamination and natural disasters are growing exponentially.


India, as this year’s host of World Environment Day, announced a complete ban on single-use plastic by 2022, taking a huge step towards reducing its waste and tackling the crisis the country/world is facing. If a country as large and as complex as India is able to rule out disposable plastics, it would affect the health of all of the oceans, and thus of the entire planet. That is how important India is in the fight against climate change.


Indians are rising to the challenge. Initiatives from the lush southern countryside to the mega cities that grid India are gaining traction. As they say in India, “a problem is only solved when it becomes complex”. We have found the problem. Now we need to fund the solutions.


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DATA INSIGHTS

According to the World Bank, India is classified as a lower-middle-income country.  The following plots provide an overview of India’s historic GHG emissions in perspective with global emissions, as well as the country’s relative vulnerability and preparedness to climate change.

India Greenhouse Gas Emissions

India’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


India’s emissions increased more than two times (116%) over the last two decades, especially between the years 2000 and 2012. This increasing trend was mainly led by high growth of energy-intensive sectors (especially the electric power industry). The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (71%) of India’s emissions, driven by a high dependence on fossil fuel electricity production (accounting for over 73% of India’s energy supply in 2014).


In 2012, India produced over 3,000 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions. This is equivalent to the amount of CO2 being absorbed annually by 14 million km² of forest (nearly five times the size of India). Being one of the world’s top three GHG emitting countries, India has a tremendous opportunity to curb emissions (particularly in their energy sector) by transitioning into renewable technologies. (Source: WRI, World Bank, 2018)



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India Greenhouse Gas Emissions

India’s timeline of total GHG emissions and the percentage change from 1990

India Greenhouse Gas Emissions

This plot combines 3 pieces of information measured from 1990 - 2012: The bar chart indicates the volume of the country’s GHG emissions, the full line shows the variation of this volume compared to the baseline 1990, and the dotted line presents the same variation, but globally.


Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and fluorocarbons are the main drivers of global warming. Between 1990 and 2012, the world’s emissions grew by 40%.


India’s emissions increased more than two times (116%) over the last two decades, especially between the years 2000 and 2012. This increasing trend was mainly led by high growth of energy-intensive sectors (especially the electric power industry). The energy sector is responsible for the largest share (71%) of India’s emissions, driven by a high dependence on fossil fuel electricity production (accounting for over 73% of India’s energy supply in 2014).


In 2012, India produced over 3,000 million tonnes of CO2 eq. GHG emissions. This is equivalent to the amount of CO2 being absorbed annually by 14 million km² of forest (nearly five times the size of India). Being one of the world’s top three GHG emitting countries, India has a tremendous opportunity to curb emissions (particularly in their energy sector) by transitioning into renewable technologies. (Source: WRI, World Bank, 2018)



India Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

India’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


India is categorized as a country with high vulnerability to climate change impacts and a low level of adaptation. As agricultural is prone to climate change, extreme weather events will have significant impacts on the country’s agricultural production and food security. Climate change is expected to lead to declined rainfall that causes more extreme droughts, thereby threatening the water security of the country. Heavy rainfall caused by climate change is likely to induce floods that threaten the population living in flood-prone areas, endangering the lives of residents. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


TAKE ACTION

India Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

India’s vulnerability and readiness to combat climate change

India Climate Vulnerability and Readiness (CVRI)

This graph ranks a country’s climate performance by measuring its readiness (x-axis) and its vulnerability (y-axis). Both are measured from 0 - 1 (1 being the most ready or most vulnerable). This index combines indicators of a country’s exposure to climate change and others that measure the country’s potential to withstand those shocks. 


Each dot in this plot represents a country. The countries in most urgent situations are on the top left of the graph whilst the most resilient ones stand at the bottom right.


India is categorized as a country with high vulnerability to climate change impacts and a low level of adaptation. As agricultural is prone to climate change, extreme weather events will have significant impacts on the country’s agricultural production and food security. Climate change is expected to lead to declined rainfall that causes more extreme droughts, thereby threatening the water security of the country. Heavy rainfall caused by climate change is likely to induce floods that threaten the population living in flood-prone areas, endangering the lives of residents. (Source: ND-GAIN, 2018)


The impacts of climate change vary by country and region. But wherever you are, local-level adaptation projects are necessary. You have all the cards in hand, now go explore our live projects and be one of the good guys. 


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