THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET

Oceans

OCEANS | ALL PROJECTS

swipe to see more

Konstantinos Dimitriadis donated € 5 to Help Build Eco-Friendly Homes for Rural Communities in India . Manon Steiner donated € 15 to Help Rwandan Cities Control Waste and Stay Clean . Bart van den Heuvel donated € 25 to Recycled Electronics for German School Children . Prateek Gogineni donated € 30 to Promote Clean Agroforestry in Rural India . Lluis Mateu donated € 50 to Bringing Back Forests In Kenya . Renato Anselmi Ricci donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,300 to E-waste Race Germany . Kiki Beck donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,500 to E-waste Race Germany . Farah Piryeva donated € 200 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ruggero Lambertini donated € 75 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Iren Dikova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Luke Farrelly donated € 120 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Andrey Bankovski donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Kalina Zhechkova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Anton Batchvarov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stivian Valchev donated € 35 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Tatyana Mitkova donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . NELIA VATEVA donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Kitov donated € 25 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Ivaylo Vasilev donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Winkler donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Valeriia Muliukova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Francesca bianchi donated € 100 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stephanie van groenendael donated € 40 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Judith de Warren donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . nat Bonnisseau donated € 1 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Luke Davis donated € 10 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stanislav Stoev donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Nathan Bonnisseau donated € 18 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Sara Riva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Luke Davis donated € 5 to E-waste Race Germany . Jürg Rohrer donated € 150 to Improved Firewood Stoves (IFS) for Indigenous Families in Guatemala . Errin Saunders donated € 10 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas .

PlanA Newsletter

PROBLEMS TO SOLVE

swipe to see more

DATA INSIGHTS

MARINE PROTECTED AREAS (MPAs)

PERCENTAGE OF MPA WITHIN A COUNTRY TERRITORIAL WATERS

The MPA score is the percentage of a country’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ: the area of sea that belongs economically to a country) that is protected by a form of preservation zone. This indicator helps to compare the level of protection and sustainable management of marine ecosystems across countries.


Typical MPAs are designed to protect ocean areas from over-fishing, extractive industries, tourism, and sometimes ultrasonic devices (such as sonar - which confuses the navigation system of whales, for example). Some MPAs are ‘no-take zones’ meaning that any fishing is prohibited. They can be incredibly effective at rebuilding stocks of marine life, and so are essential in marine conservation. However, only 1% of US MPAs are fully no-take zones.


This treemap visualisation shows the MPA score for regions and countries. Each box represents a country, and the size of the box represents the MPA score (given as a number from 0-100 when hovering over the individual box) - a bigger box equals a higher (and better) score. Click on regions of the treemap to zoom in from global to country level, and zoom out by clicking on the button at the top right.


When at the subcontinent level, you can compare all of this region’s countries easily. Those at the top left, with bigger boxes, have higher MPAs than those at the bottom right corner, who have the lowest. These are the countries that have seriously threatened ocean ecosystems.


Globally, there are around 14,688 MPAs covering an area of 14.9 million km2, making up 10.1% of the global marine ecosystem. Although nearly 99% of countries have established more than 50% of national marine areas under effective protection, a few countries, such as Haiti, lag far behind in establishing MPAs.


Countries with low MPA scores are struggling to protect their oceans and marine life. This, of course, is typically due to difficult circumstances such as national poverty and political instability (making the establishment of MPAs low on the agenda). Since successful MPAs can ensure sustainable fisheries and food security, they are of great benefit to nations if managed properly - and so could be a key long term consideration for planning in developing nations (Source: EPI, 2018).


TAKE ACTION

MARINE PROTECTED AREAS (MPAs)

PERCENTAGE OF MPA WITHIN A COUNTRY TERRITORIAL WATERS

The MPA score is the percentage of a country’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ: the area of sea that belongs economically to a country) that is protected by a form of preservation zone. This indicator helps to compare the level of protection and sustainable management of marine ecosystems across countries.


Typical MPAs are designed to protect ocean areas from over-fishing, extractive industries, tourism, and sometimes ultrasonic devices (such as sonar - which confuses the navigation system of whales, for example). Some MPAs are ‘no-take zones’ meaning that any fishing is prohibited. They can be incredibly effective at rebuilding stocks of marine life, and so are essential in marine conservation. However, only 1% of US MPAs are fully no-take zones.


This treemap visualisation shows the MPA score for regions and countries. Each box represents a country, and the size of the box represents the MPA score (given as a number from 0-100 when hovering over the individual box) - a bigger box equals a higher (and better) score. Click on regions of the treemap to zoom in from global to country level, and zoom out by clicking on the button at the top right.


When at the subcontinent level, you can compare all of this region’s countries easily. Those at the top left, with bigger boxes, have higher MPAs than those at the bottom right corner, who have the lowest. These are the countries that have seriously threatened ocean ecosystems.


Globally, there are around 14,688 MPAs covering an area of 14.9 million km2, making up 10.1% of the global marine ecosystem. Although nearly 99% of countries have established more than 50% of national marine areas under effective protection, a few countries, such as Haiti, lag far behind in establishing MPAs.


Countries with low MPA scores are struggling to protect their oceans and marine life. This, of course, is typically due to difficult circumstances such as national poverty and political instability (making the establishment of MPAs low on the agenda). Since successful MPAs can ensure sustainable fisheries and food security, they are of great benefit to nations if managed properly - and so could be a key long term consideration for planning in developing nations (Source: EPI, 2018).


Level of water stress

EFFICIENCY OF FRESH WATER RESOURCES AGAINST WATER SCARCITY

Water stress level indicates the ratio of freshwater withdrawal to available freshwater resources. Major sectors such as agriculture, manufacturing and construction use enormous amounts of freshwater, making it an increasingly valuable and scarce resource in countries where it is not abundant.


This indicator helps to monitor SDG Target 6.4: Water Use and Scarcity. The UN predicts that by 2025, two thirds of the global population will live in regions of water stress. Given the importance of water to human life and activity, this is clearly a serious issue. In many areas, it is becoming essential to improve the efficiency of water use, reduce it on the whole, and make use of non-conventional resources such as wastewater, desalination and agricultural drainage water. 


The treemap visualisation compares the level of water stress between countries. Each box represents one country, with a bigger box indicating higher stress. Zooming in to Northern Africa, we can see that Libya has a stress level of over 1000%, whilst Morocco is on 49%. The FAO defines the start of water stress as 25%, with 70% and above indicating serious water stress.  

 

Although Oceania has a low availability of the freshwater resource, it has the lowest level of water stress (2%) due to low population density. Sub-Saharan Africa, one of the world’s driest regions, is the second least water-stressed region (3%) because of a low water-intensive economy.  


All Asian subcontinents face severe freshwater stress, led by Central Asia (79%), Western Asia (65%), Southern Asia (49%) and Eastern Asia (30%). Due to its high population density and water-intensive economy, especially in agriculture (cotton, rice, wheat and vegetables), Asia has considerably higher freshwater demands compared to other regions. Northern Africa is withdrawing more than 100% of their available freshwater resources. This occurs mainly because of the overexploitation of freshwater resources triggered by growing (and inadequate) demand on the side of agriculture and energy sectors. (Source: SDG 6.4, AQUASTAT, 2018)

TAKE ACTION

Level of water stress

EFFICIENCY OF FRESH WATER RESOURCES AGAINST WATER SCARCITY

Water stress level indicates the ratio of freshwater withdrawal to available freshwater resources. Major sectors such as agriculture, manufacturing and construction use enormous amounts of freshwater, making it an increasingly valuable and scarce resource in countries where it is not abundant.


This indicator helps to monitor SDG Target 6.4: Water Use and Scarcity. The UN predicts that by 2025, two thirds of the global population will live in regions of water stress. Given the importance of water to human life and activity, this is clearly a serious issue. In many areas, it is becoming essential to improve the efficiency of water use, reduce it on the whole, and make use of non-conventional resources such as wastewater, desalination and agricultural drainage water. 


The treemap visualisation compares the level of water stress between countries. Each box represents one country, with a bigger box indicating higher stress. Zooming in to Northern Africa, we can see that Libya has a stress level of over 1000%, whilst Morocco is on 49%. The FAO defines the start of water stress as 25%, with 70% and above indicating serious water stress.  

 

Although Oceania has a low availability of the freshwater resource, it has the lowest level of water stress (2%) due to low population density. Sub-Saharan Africa, one of the world’s driest regions, is the second least water-stressed region (3%) because of a low water-intensive economy.  


All Asian subcontinents face severe freshwater stress, led by Central Asia (79%), Western Asia (65%), Southern Asia (49%) and Eastern Asia (30%). Due to its high population density and water-intensive economy, especially in agriculture (cotton, rice, wheat and vegetables), Asia has considerably higher freshwater demands compared to other regions. Northern Africa is withdrawing more than 100% of their available freshwater resources. This occurs mainly because of the overexploitation of freshwater resources triggered by growing (and inadequate) demand on the side of agriculture and energy sectors. (Source: SDG 6.4, AQUASTAT, 2018)

Share this page

BE ONE OF THE GOOD GUYS...

OCEANS | ALL PROJECTS

swipe to see more

THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET THERE IS NO PLAN B FOR OUR PLANET