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Waste Management

WASTE MANAGEMENT | ALL PROJECTS

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Konstantinos Dimitriadis donated € 5 to Help Build Eco-Friendly Homes for Rural Communities in India . Manon Steiner donated € 15 to Help Rwandan Cities Control Waste and Stay Clean . Bart van den Heuvel donated € 25 to Recycled Electronics for German School Children . Prateek Gogineni donated € 30 to Promote Clean Agroforestry in Rural India . Lluis Mateu donated € 50 to Bringing Back Forests In Kenya . Renato Anselmi Ricci donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,300 to E-waste Race Germany . Kiki Beck donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Donal O‘Byrne donated € 1,500 to E-waste Race Germany . Farah Piryeva donated € 200 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Ruggero Lambertini donated € 75 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Iren Dikova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Vladimir Topencharov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Luke Farrelly donated € 120 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Andrey Bankovski donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Kalina Zhechkova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Anton Batchvarov donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stivian Valchev donated € 35 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Tatyana Mitkova donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . NELIA VATEVA donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Kitov donated € 25 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Ivaylo Vasilev donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Alex Winkler donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Valeriia Muliukova donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Francesca bianchi donated € 100 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stephanie van groenendael donated € 40 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Judith de Warren donated € 50 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . nat Bonnisseau donated € 1 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Luke Davis donated € 10 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Stanislav Stoev donated € 30 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Nathan Bonnisseau donated € 18 to Recruiting 20,000 New Sagarmitra Student Volunteers . Sara Riva donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles . Luke Davis donated € 5 to E-waste Race Germany . Jürg Rohrer donated € 150 to Improved Firewood Stoves (IFS) for Indigenous Families in Guatemala . Errin Saunders donated € 10 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem . Elise van Groningen donated € 20 to E-waste Race Germany . Peter Popdonev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Svetlana Goranova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Saglara Inzhieva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Emiliyana Terziyska donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Daniel Mendez donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Rumyana Velcheva donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Martin Bakardzhiev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Sandeep Bajjuri donated € 25 to binee - Interactive E-Waste Collection System . cyrielle simeone donated € 50 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere . Milka Koldamova donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Steffen Albrecht donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Trayan Angelov donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas . Felizia Kuhlke donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas .

PlanA Newsletter

PROBLEMS TO SOLVE

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DATA INSIGHTS

MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE GENERATION

SHOWS (IN TONNES, 2016) MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE GENERATION FOR REGIONS AND COUNTRIES

This sunburst plot shows, in tonnes, the municipal solid waste (MSW) generation for regions and countries in the year 2016. MSW is the stuff that we all throw away in our everyday lives - think trash, garbage, rubbish and so on. The central ring of the plot shows the total production of MSW for each continent; you can see that Asia leads with almost 1 billion tonnes produced in 2016 (which was 45.5% of the world total).


Zooming in on Asia, we see that India (277 million tonnes) and China (220 million tonnes) are, as you would expect, the biggest producers (responsible for 55% of Asia’s total). Their populations of 1.34 billion and 1.38 billion respectively will inevitably produce a lot of trash. What’s interesting, however, is that the USA itself produces 263 million tonnes, but with a population just 327 million. This demonstrates how much waste we humans are capable of producing (USA), and how many people there are on the way to reaching this level. 


Municipal solid waste is responsible for a host of environmental problems. From plastics clogging rivers and ending up in the stomachs of ocean species, to landfills leaking pollutants and toxic chemicals into the surrounding land and waterways, the range of damage is broad. Some countries are way ahead in terms of waste collection and recycling infrastructure. For example, in 2017 Germany recycled 56% of its MSW whilst the US (which, as we have seen, produces a lot of rubbish) hit just under 35%.  


56% is, of course, still not enough - and in many parts of the world it will be quite some time before a level like this is reached. It is encouraging that awareness of waste management is growing (for example, shunning disposable plastic bags and using minimal packaging) - but a lower-waste lifestyle is not one that everybody is able to foster. As resources dwindle and the climate continues to warm, it is vital that governments and industries further develop research into, and commitment to, more circular manufacturing and economies. As individuals, most of us are able to consume less, buy second hand, and recycle what we can. It is up to political and business leaders to build societies that truly enable sustainable lifestyles. (Source: World bank: What a Waste)

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MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE GENERATION

SHOWS (IN TONNES, 2016) MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE GENERATION FOR REGIONS AND COUNTRIES

This sunburst plot shows, in tonnes, the municipal solid waste (MSW) generation for regions and countries in the year 2016. MSW is the stuff that we all throw away in our everyday lives - think trash, garbage, rubbish and so on. The central ring of the plot shows the total production of MSW for each continent; you can see that Asia leads with almost 1 billion tonnes produced in 2016 (which was 45.5% of the world total).


Zooming in on Asia, we see that India (277 million tonnes) and China (220 million tonnes) are, as you would expect, the biggest producers (responsible for 55% of Asia’s total). Their populations of 1.34 billion and 1.38 billion respectively will inevitably produce a lot of trash. What’s interesting, however, is that the USA itself produces 263 million tonnes, but with a population just 327 million. This demonstrates how much waste we humans are capable of producing (USA), and how many people there are on the way to reaching this level. 


Municipal solid waste is responsible for a host of environmental problems. From plastics clogging rivers and ending up in the stomachs of ocean species, to landfills leaking pollutants and toxic chemicals into the surrounding land and waterways, the range of damage is broad. Some countries are way ahead in terms of waste collection and recycling infrastructure. For example, in 2017 Germany recycled 56% of its MSW whilst the US (which, as we have seen, produces a lot of rubbish) hit just under 35%.  


56% is, of course, still not enough - and in many parts of the world it will be quite some time before a level like this is reached. It is encouraging that awareness of waste management is growing (for example, shunning disposable plastic bags and using minimal packaging) - but a lower-waste lifestyle is not one that everybody is able to foster. As resources dwindle and the climate continues to warm, it is vital that governments and industries further develop research into, and commitment to, more circular manufacturing and economies. As individuals, most of us are able to consume less, buy second hand, and recycle what we can. It is up to political and business leaders to build societies that truly enable sustainable lifestyles. (Source: World bank: What a Waste)

Hazardous Waste

AMOUNT OF TOXIC, INFECTION, RADIOACTIVE WASTE GENERATED IN NATURE

Hazardous waste consists of materials that are toxic, infectious or flammable properties which pose a potential hazard to humans and the environment. For instance, waste generated from biomedical waste from hospitals and other specific fields, are hazardous. In March 1989, the Basel Convention was adopted, aiming for sound management of hazardous waste, especially preventing the disposal of hazardous waste by industrial countries in developing countries where stringent policies were lacking and environmental disasters have repeatedly happened.     


The plot here informs the amount of hazardous generated in tonnes in the year 2014. Countries such as Khazakstan, Serbia or Germany produce between 10-40 million tonnes of toxic waste each year. If properly managed, this can become a source of valuable recycled material. E-waste, one of the biggest sources of waste in the 21st century, contains some of the most precious rare metals on the planet, the same that are extracted with blood and tears year after year.

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Hazardous Waste

AMOUNT OF TOXIC, INFECTION, RADIOACTIVE WASTE GENERATED IN NATURE

MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE GENERATION

Hazardous waste consists of materials that are toxic, infectious or flammable properties which pose a potential hazard to humans and the environment. For instance, waste generated from biomedical waste from hospitals and other specific fields, are hazardous. In March 1989, the Basel Convention was adopted, aiming for sound management of hazardous waste, especially preventing the disposal of hazardous waste by industrial countries in developing countries where stringent policies were lacking and environmental disasters have repeatedly happened.     


The plot here informs the amount of hazardous generated in tonnes in the year 2014. Countries such as Khazakstan, Serbia or Germany produce between 10-40 million tonnes of toxic waste each year. If properly managed, this can become a source of valuable recycled material. E-waste, one of the biggest sources of waste in the 21st century, contains some of the most precious rare metals on the planet, the same that are extracted with blood and tears year after year.

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WASTE MANAGEMENT | ALL PROJECTS

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