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Wildlife

Wildlife is concerned with the protection of species, the preservation of their habitats and the rewilding of natural spaces. It encompasses but does not limit to the animal world. All living things fall under the wildlife theme. Yes. Even sea cucumbers.


What is the inherent importance of wildlife at the scale of our planet? Well, it’s everything. Before any live matter appeared on the globe, planet Earth was but a scorching planet not so different from Venus and Mars. If it weren’t for living things and their innovative photosynthesis technique, our planet would be a very different, very lifeless place.


Once the process of transforming CO2 into O2 using solar rays was figured out by single-cell algae, the transformation of the Earth’s dynamics, and especially its atmosphere, became inevitable. The living component of the planet is therefore arguably the most important tipping point for the advent of a planet fit for human life.


The biosphere is the most sensitive and adaptable layer of the planet. Living forces regulate the levels of mineral and atmospheric components of the planet, just like the aforementioned levels of CO2 and O2.

When there is an imbalance, the most adapted species rises to a point where it depletes the environment from resources it needs to survive (reminds you of anyone?). When this point is reached, the species’ population falls back to a level that can be handled by its environment.


This is a state-of-the-art check and balance system to regulate the planet’s equilibrium on a local as well as on a global level. But there is a catch. The interdependence and correlations between all of the species and ecosystems also make the whole system fragile. If too many species fail at the same time, then the entire structure menaces to collapse, and drag in its wake the rest of the planetary structure, such as the atmosphere’s composition and the richness of the soil. 


WILDLIFE | ALL PROJECTS

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john gaffey donated € 12 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Adi Lazos donated € 22 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Juliana Medaglia donated € 20 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. FREDERIC ACHARD donated € 50 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Thalita Medaglia donated € 15 to Fighting the Silent Disappearance of the Great Brazilian Savannah. Katie Hereing donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Angelica Seminara donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Nevena Vlaykova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Melanie Bitto donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Cristiano Rocco Marra donated € 30 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ro Leaver donated € 30 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Phili Denning donated € 25 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Isabel gregory donated € 20 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Akshay Pai donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Emma Burnett donated € 50 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Boyan Mihaylov donated € 50 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. François Leclerc donated € 40 to Application of satellite telemetry data to better understand the breeding strategies of humpback whales in the Southern Hemisphere. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Clara Hermansson donated € 40 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Peter Thompson donated € 10 to Environmental Protection through Greenery and Awareness Interventions in Kabul and Wardak. Vihra Dincheva donated € 30 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Kris Bertens donated € 50 to Educating Montenegro's New Generation to Break Free from Litter and Plastic. Anna Lupanova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Simona Dakova donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Neicho Rahnev donated € 10 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Pavel Boev donated € 20 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Francesco Zanetto donated € 60 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Hind Alsalloom donated € 50 to Iraqi Youth Climate Change Movement. Francesca Cardani donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Michele Frison donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Fabio Sai donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Paola Tresca donated € 27 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Andrea Mongiello donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Matteo Masi donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Massimo Sacco donated € 10 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Ananda Nidhi donated € 20 to Toranam: Strengthening Agroforestry in Andhra Pradesh. andrea borsetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. ALESSIO GIANNONI donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Yordan Yordanov donated € 25 to The Bedechka Case: Fighting the Neglect of Green Urban Areas. Laura Zorzetto donated € 15 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Rossana Mattachini donated € 20 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Elsa De Grandi donated € 5 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Empowering Mangrove Women for a Healthy & Resilient Ecosystem. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Expanding Sesi’s Bottle Refill Scheme to Make Zero Plastic Waste Shopping Mainstream in the UK. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Agro Eco Village Project in Ri-Bhoi District. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Building an Efficient Technology for Women's Economic Empowerment. Noah Silver donated € 15 to Strengthening Malian Forest Management to Protect Biodiversity and Alleviate Poverty. Noah Silver donated € 30 to Toxic Chemicals and Waste Sensitization for Vulnerable Communities. Stefania Butera donated € 25 to CROWDFOREST: Making Reforestation Faster and Free through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

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PROBLEMS TO SOLVE

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DATA INSIGHTS

Species Protection Index (SPI)

AVERAGE AREA OF SPECIES DISTRIBUTION UNDER PROTECTION

SPI measures the average area of species distributions in protected areas in a country and provides a measure of how many wildlife species and how much of their habitats are under protection. It is developed to quantify biodiversity loss and improve the conservation status of wildlife species and habitats. The Aichi Biodiversity Targets (orange dotted line in the plot) serves as a benchmark for countries to conserve at least 17% of national terrestrial and inland water areas (particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services) by 2020. Each dot in the plot represents a country and its SPI score (Y-axis). Countries at the bottom with the relatively poor score are behind in terms of species protection when compared to the countries at the top of the graph.


As of 2018, nearly all countries are not on track to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. In order to achieve the global Targets, increasing financial and technical support to assist those countries lagging behind in terms of species conservation is one key area of action.


SPI use remote sensing data, which can help to track changes in ecosystems on a large scale with improved efficiency and standardization. However, remote sensing and aerial photography are limited in their ability to assess all changes in biodiversity. Thus, assessment of certain measures of biodiversity still requires human-assisted data collection a process often hindered by a limited number of professionals with adequate funding.

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Species Protection Index (SPI)

AVERAGE AREA OF SPECIES DISTRIBUTION UNDER PROTECTION

Graph

SPI measures the average area of species distributions in protected areas in a country and provides a measure of how many wildlife species and how much of their habitats are under protection. It is developed to quantify biodiversity loss and improve the conservation status of wildlife species and habitats. The Aichi Biodiversity Targets (orange dotted line in the plot) serves as a benchmark for countries to conserve at least 17% of national terrestrial and inland water areas (particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services) by 2020. Each dot in the plot represents a country and its SPI score (Y-axis). Countries at the bottom with the relatively poor score are behind in terms of species protection when compared to the countries at the top of the graph.


As of 2018, nearly all countries are not on track to achieve the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. In order to achieve the global Targets, increasing financial and technical support to assist those countries lagging behind in terms of species conservation is one key area of action.


SPI use remote sensing data, which can help to track changes in ecosystems on a large scale with improved efficiency and standardization. However, remote sensing and aerial photography are limited in their ability to assess all changes in biodiversity. Thus, assessment of certain measures of biodiversity still requires human-assisted data collection a process often hindered by a limited number of professionals with adequate funding.

No. of Bird Species threatened

NUMBER OF THREATENED BIRD SPECIES PER COUNTRY

The International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List is a crucial indicator for tracking progress and achieving the SDGs. This indicator evaluates the status of endangered species and provides a list of endangered and threatened species around the world. Each dot in the plot represents a country and the number of bird species threatened in each country. This plot uses threatened bird species to demonstrate how human activity impacts on wildlife. 


Brazil and Indonesia both have over 150 threatened bird species, far more than other countries around the world. They also have the highest level of deforestation for resource extraction, agriculture, and urbanisation. Together they hold nearly 35% of the world’s tropical forest and are home to more than 30% of the world’s known bird species.  According to BirdLife, agriculture is the biggest threat, affecting 1,091 species (which is 74% of all threatened species). Logging is the second leading threat against birds and impacts 734 species (50% of all threatened species). (World Bank, 2017; BirdLife, 2018)

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No. of Bird Species threatened

NUMBER OF THREATENED BIRD SPECIES PER COUNTRY

Graph

The International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) Red List is a crucial indicator for tracking progress and achieving the SDGs. This indicator evaluates the status of endangered species and provides a list of endangered and threatened species around the world. Each dot in the plot represents a country and the number of bird species threatened in each country. This plot uses threatened bird species to demonstrate how human activity impacts on wildlife. 


Brazil and Indonesia both have over 150 threatened bird species, far more than other countries around the world. They also have the highest level of deforestation for resource extraction, agriculture, and urbanisation. Together they hold nearly 35% of the world’s tropical forest and are home to more than 30% of the world’s known bird species.  According to BirdLife, agriculture is the biggest threat, affecting 1,091 species (which is 74% of all threatened species). Logging is the second leading threat against birds and impacts 734 species (50% of all threatened species). (World Bank, 2017; BirdLife, 2018)

COUNTRY HOTSPOTS

These are the countries where this theme is particularly important and
need most pressing action. Discover the hotspots.

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WILDLIFE | ALL PROJECTS

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